THE OLIVIA BAG

Italian base designer Olivia Carmignani has persistently blurred the lines dividing fashion and art. A young Italian bag brand with a sense of aesthetic conviction far beyond her years. While Olivias bags design is described as exquisite, her labour process of production is anything but basic and underscored by a refined formula of design. Olivia applauds tradition. The ‘Made in Italy’ DNA is anchored in the brand by an exhaustive approach to materiality, explosive sexuality through intelligent forms, sensual silhouettes.

“A particular model of bag, as well as the colours, ever exasperated, finely process complex. Everything is studied in detail, taking cues from what most attracts: nature. Nature in its artistic form, in its simplicity, in all its complexity, in what natural about ourselves we do every day”-Olivia Carmignani.

Olivia next move for her brand is to get her bag into a network of multi brand stores, where her customers can not only purchased online, but also to purchase our in stores where they can touch and smell their pieces.

olivia-bags.com/en

A TRUE ENLIGHTENMENT FROM BLOOD BROTHER AW2016 COLLECTION

It is a highly distinctive menswear brand that has precision and attention to detail led aesthetics. The brand in question is BLOOD BROTHER. Over time it has created a new breed of sportswear with that just appeals to a spectrum of men. Not forgetting as one of the most sought after menswear brand.

Known for its cutting edge approach to style and design, a trademark Blood Brothers is  known for. Which leads to delving into their Autumn Winter 2016 collection title Enlightenment. The collection is based on the inspiration of the industrial revolution in the 17th and 18th century. A period where there was a fierce dramatic shift in peoples everyday life and also seen as a period that  shaped the future of  Britain.  This also brings to mind when there were new modern factories and technological advances being introduced. A century where the enlightened few were at the forefront of civilisation hence the  brand draws inspiration to create a collection that embodies that period of time.

Boundaries  are  pushed in the form of introducing new purpose and mixing it with the old.  Nicholas Biela and James Waller, the founders and creative directors of Blood Brother celebrates the revolutionary ideas and willingness of those wanting to push boundaries as this has always been the DNA of the brand. The AW2016 collection positions the old and new, drawing parallels to out most recent space conquest, engineering feats, advances in medicine and most importantly the explosion of the  digital age.  We see fine bold statement polo necks, graphics with a tongue in cheek messages, which are sliced together into collages that hint at obscure scientific advancement.

As far as the above-mentioned inspiration goes of juxtapositioning the old and the new which is clearly achieved. Another area of success  of Blood Brother AW2016 collection is the colour palette. The gold glow representing the of the old  burnt umber chimney furnace and  blue of the deep heat on the molten metal.  Smart silhouettes and thick shearling coats punctuated by standout futuristic crushed silver bomber are some of the featured pieces in the collection.

Furthermore, another area of Blood Brother revolution with its AW2016 collection is the reimage of its classic joggers to a luxurious suede. Also, to depict the workmanship nature of the 17th and 18th century of the industrial time period, the brand is seen to have updated its sweater and Tshirt with pocket detailing.

Finally, this, in fact, goes to support the true essence of Blood Brother precision in able to innovate and push themselves in achieving a cutting edge and standout sartorial menswear collection.

ROUGH UK NIGHT OUT: CONTEMPORARY ASIAN FUSION CUISINE @ 100 ISLINGTON

09/26/16
Anita Keshi

270 Upper Street , London , N1 2UQ

You wouldn’t be wrong in thinking Islington’s Upper Street didn’t need another addition to their already thriving selection of restaurants and bars, however, new residents 100 Islington Bar & Restaurant are set to prove otherwise. The Asian and Middle Eastern infused restaurant chain are steadily making their mark in N1 following on from the success of their Hoxton branch.

Led by executive chef Francis “Ace” Puyat, previously at Ottolenghi’s NOPI, 100 Restaurants delivers an inventive but simple food concept for mini sharing dishes inspired by Asian flavours and spices.

With a large retracting glass front window, modern metallic embellishments and muted colour scheme the understated decor fits in perfectly amongst the cool Islington vibe. The spacious layout sees a bar area in the front, opening up to the restaurant – a swanky slightly more intimate interior with velvet booths and dim lights reminiscent of an upscale vintage parlour. The statement well-stocked bar, built in the middle of the restaurant reflects the noteworthy drinks menu of cocktails, champagne and fine wine to gourmet coffees and fresh pressed juices.

Skimming through the bold and complex menu, it reads as a “what’s what” in the finest of asian fusion cuisine with eye-catching foods such as Braised octopus and Rainbow trout. There’s the Lunch and a Sunday Lunch with staple roast pieces and a touch of wasabi. We can’t forget the mouthwatering champagne and cocktail ‘Tipples’ selection –  In-house concoctions such as the Silent Pool Martini – gin, elderflower cassis and lemonade to classics, martini and Pina colada. It gets better with the impressive dinner menu, 23 plates of glorious sounding dishes including chargrilled lamb belly, chili fried rice with chilli prawn sambal and desserts such as Mango, lemongrass and lime panna cotta. Hungry yet?

We stopped by to sample the unlimited Aperol spritz brunch, opting for the ‘Big Breakfast’. Served in a large beautifully presented plate, the “breakfast” consisted of familiar brunch favourites, fried eggs, bacon with an introduction of the insanely juicy sesame crusted pork belly, buttered portobello mushrooms, sweet and crisp spring onion hash browns and a side of homemade jalapeno salsa. For a nonchalant brunch, our Big breakfast was quite the elaborate dish, a star meal packed with flavour with the Asian twist setting it far apart from many brunches on the scene. Also on the brunch menu is Koroke – Korean cheese croquette served with bacon, poached eggs and sweet chili sauce and the Superfood breakfast – a vegetarian option of the Big Breakfast including power grain quinoa, sweet potato and mix seeds.

Must try – If you’re in a rush try their £5 lunch boxes and Lunch Happy hour discounted cocktails, negroni, prosecco and Aperol Spritz for only £4.75.

Verdict –  100 Restaurant offers high end cuisine with affordable prices. It’s a laid back, cool space for a contemporary twist on Asian cuisine. All dishes are also incidentally gluten free.

Price – A meal for two with drinks from about £70, Sharing menu from £30 per person based on 2 people.

SORAPOLS BEAUTY UNDER THE MOON

09/28/16
Liat Shaaf @liatshaaf
 

Photography – TARAS SHYMBRA

A legend. A princess. A journey of becoming ones own. A special flower.  Kadupul. This was the magical and enthriling inspiration for SORAPOLs SS17 collection. 

The Kadupul flower, known as the Gekka Bijin, or “Beauty Under The Moon, is a legendary rare desert flower of a Cactus, which blossoms at night for just a few mesmerizing moments. The Kadupul Flower is a rare plant, and it cannot be picked without causing damage to it. It will only last for hours after being picked therefore can rarely be bought, making it priceless. 

Taketori Monogatari, an early Japanese folk tale is a story of Princess Kaguya who was discovered by a childless bamboo-cutter inside a bamboo as a baby the size of a thumb. She grew up to be a beautiful girl. Whenever Kaguya looked at the full moon, her eyes filled with tears. Burdened with longing and sadness, she was able to bare it no longer, and she revealed that she was not of this world and must return to her people on the Moon. 

These are the inspirations for SORAPOLs SS17 10-piece collection of fairy-like delicate, romantic, flowing evening dresses. Feminine and luxurious, the lacy dresses are truly worthy of a princess. In pale, pure white and black, these lovely, couture-like frocks are majestic and regal, yet playful and girly. Made of soft mesh, silvery silks and opulent organzas, and adorned with lots of flowers, delicate bead work and intricate embroidery, they are rich and enchanting. Just like a rare flower given to a celestial princess. 

The brightness and whiteness of the Kadupul flower and the sandy dunes and the inky black of night make a minimalist color pallet with the strongest effect of elegance, strength and yet contrasting feminine fragility. 

SORAPOL is a London-centric designer brand of Founder & Head Designer Sorapol Chawaphatnakul and Creative Director & British artist Daniel Lismore. The brand launched their first collection True Colours in SS12. The label quickly gained attention from the fashion press, featuring in Elle, Vogue, Tatler, GQ, Harpers Bazaar, Dazed & Confused, W Magazine and more. 

Their creations have been worn by trend setters such as Kylie Minogue, Paloma Faith, Azealia Banks, Rita Ora, Cara Delevingne, to name a few.

MUSIC SHARE THIS PAGE GITTA DE RIDDERS EVEN IF

09/24/16
Akil Wingate @akilwingate
 

Gitta de Ridder returns with a new sweet folksy record called Even If. The Anglo-Dutch singer-songwriter first burst upon the scene in 2014. Fast forward to today and shes got a lovely new tune tucked under her arm. Even If is a joyful, optimistic and even sentimental turn, with its intimate guitars and charming backing vocals.

I wouldnt let you down
Even If
And so it goes. She runs through a list of possible scenarios that might dog an ordinary friend and cause them not to be there for someone. But de Ridder is not an ordinary friend. As she displays through a charming level of poetry and song structure, she wont let anyone down…even if.
Whats puzzling is what happens next? When Gitta de Ridder reaches stardom with her intimate take on storytelling and songwriting, how will that intimacy and the growing crowds of adoring fans coexist? Peacefully I imagine. This is a sentimental sort of tune and the video just as charming as the melody.
When do you play this? Now. Check out Gitta de Ridders Even If here first.

ARISE : ALEXIS MARCOU

04/19/12
Agma Matuszczak
 

Since graduating from Plymouth University, Alexis Marcou has been living and working freelance from Greece. For us, it’s a combination of digital and hand sketched illustation that makes his work almost tangible. We talk to him about his latest collaboration with NIKE and he explains why self initiated projects are essential in every artist’s career.

How did you become involve with NIKE?

NIKE founded me through a project I did, called Cocaine, which was a self-initiated project. And that’s why I value those more than commision projects. They are the fishing baits, they draw the attention of the company. At that time NIKE wanted to produce something related to a skeleton, which I worked on a lot for Cocaine. So that’s how it all started…

You use a very small selection of colour in your work. Why?

I like to focus more on the design and the structure. But as years go by I started adding more colour. As you can see with the NIKE campaign, JUST DO IT, it wasn’t actually my choice, but they pushed me to use more colour and it came out better than I thought. Generally I always use a minimum selection because I like to tone the pencil and I don’t like the colour to wipe it out. I like the structure of the pencil more.

From all the projects you’ve done so far, which was the most rewarding for you as for an artist?

I think the project I did called NOIR. I was trying to play with photorealism and verting it into the computer age and then build up from there so I felt like it was a pilot project. It was definitely the most experimanetal thing I’ve done and I like what I’ve done with it. It was definitely something different.

How does you creative process work? How do you get inspired?

Every project is different. For every project I make a folder that I put everything that drags me to the mood of it. For example, for the Designers Against Child Slavery I thought of using pink make up to make it even more disturbing and affect more people. I tried different ways to put this make-up on the paper because it didn’t want to stay in, I had to experiment a lot. That is the example of a random, real-life inspiration. Other than that I am always very inspired by Cubism, Minimalism and photography.

Tell us Alexis, what are you working on at the moment?

I have just finished collaborating with Jaybo on the Cisco project we did in London. At the moment  I’m also working on 3 other projects for NIKE, unfortunately I can’t get into more details…

14.09.2011 

www.alexismarcou.com

ROUGH UK NIGHT OUT AT BABABOOM – THE ULTIMATE CHARGRILLED KITCHEN

Location: Bababoom 30 Battersea Rise London,SW11 1EE

It’s no surprise Middle Eastern has become one of the UK’s most sought after cuisines. However, unlike recent contemporary twists on the likes of Pan-Asian and Caribbean cuisines, there’s not yet been a ‘wow’ worthy Middle Eastern version for the current wave of foodies. Well, until now. Enter Bababoom, a cool, quaint and cozy food joint in Clapham’s Battersea Rise. The new eatery, which launched on September 6th, is the brainchild of super foodies, Eve, Travis and Jono who have used their combined 30 years of food experience to create a restaurant injecting a dose of modern Middle Eastern to the booming Clapham foodie hub.

The restaurant no doubt adds some coolness to Battersea Rise with specks of bold reds and golds and architectural detailing with an open kitchen against tawny brick walls.The animated, buzzy eatery attracts a varied mix of young instagram ready creatives and professionals capturing the London zeitgeist perfectly.Upon entering, we were greeted with a beguiling welcome from co-owners Jono and Eve. We were then settled in with one of their signature bergamot frozen margaritas…and then another…and then one more – they were that good!

Our eyes pranced around the menu which was divided into Nibbles – Baba’s hummus and Sweet Potato Tahini. Mains offering a selection of meats over Flatbread or fresh Fattoush Salad which included Saffron & Orange chicken, Short Rib Beef Adana complete with add-ons such as Lamb Merguez Sausage and plenty more. Sides include Dukkah fries and earthy spicy super grain Freekah Tabbouleh. The small but rich dessert menu of Afters offers the likes of Caramel doused vodka and Chocolate cardamom bowl. Rounding up the menu is Bababoom’s varied Drinks section with a fine selection of beers, wines, top notch cocktails, mimosas and fresh juices spearheaded by former Hawksmoor drinks whizz Ali Reynolds.

Our food marathon began with a grand opening of delicious mezze starting with the rich Baba’s hummus, Rose Harissa Labneh and the moorish Dukkah Whitebait which was a surprising front runner – melt in your mouth crisp texture with a smoky aftertaste. The Harissa Labneh, a smooth thick hummus, with an aromatic fiery kick, was a deserving runner up. Affable staff were attentive throughout, ensuring our glasses were always full and we were stocked up with delicious tangy/herb side sauces!

Fresh out the mangal grill, mains was the Rotisserie Lamb Shoulder – large chunks of juicy lamb, garnished in pomegranate onions, oversized fresh chilies, crunchy salad layered over a fluffy warm Persian flatbread.

We finished with theToasted Boom!Mallows Peach Melba – grilled peach melba with yoghurt sorbet and toasted marshmallows and the Chocolate Cardamon bowl with honeycomb and yoghurt. Both decadent and soaring on our flavour barometer. Toasted Boom! was nothing short of outstanding – the combination of the toasted marshmallows, grilled warmth of the peach against the creamy yoghurt sorbet, made for one hell of a dessert!

Must Try

Dukkah Whitebait, Toasted Boom!

Avoid

Everything we tasted was a star dish.

Price

From £30* per person based on nibbles, mains, afters and one drink.

Verdict – 9/10

Bababoom effortlessly blends Middle Eastern flavour with quality British goods served within a trendy, non-pretentious setting. From nibbles to feasts, beers to margaritas, hearty to healthy, Bababoom satisfies across all levels delivering “Real food and big flavours!”

Dinner’s not the only meal course on offer, Bababoom have a jam-packed mouthwatering menu offering a killer brunch on the weekends from 10.30am-3pm. Also, the restaurant will be serving their Baba’s midnight feasts every Friday and Saturday, until midnight, so there’s no reason to miss out on the fun.

LIA GONCALVES: A PRECIOUS UNIQUENESS

Lia Goncalves: A precious uniqueness

A precious uniqueness, charismatic craftsmanship, mother of minimalism, minimalism that unites each of her collection inspired by not just her environment but by the outside element and also by the things unseen. This how we like to describe in word the jewelleries of Lia Gonçalves, the Portuguese base jewellery designer who have been well prepared through education and talent to create some of out of this world jewelleries from her studio in Portugal.

Her artist formation, base on traditional techniques working exclusively in sterling silver with finish options of natural silver, bleached, golden, oxidized and golden rose, reaching her well defined personal style and shapes and sometimes intimist.she pride herself in paying attention to detail and this is evidence in all her piece and are all handmade.

Her new collection is the CORAL collection, inspired by the natural coral collected by her father during his travels in the 80s in the red sea. The new collection comprises of neckleces, brooches, rings, and earrings. In this collection Lia explored geometry combined simplicity, line and organizes shapes.

In all, Lia Gonçalves is an art whose essence lies in the meaning that shapes the work, an investigation turned into emotional charismatic aesthetic experience.

Her collection is available to buy from selected leading stores in Portugal like scar-id store in Porto.

THE MORPHEW CONCEPT

MORPHEW is the unique vintage brand with a twist. Pairing Vintage pieces and customized garments together – Giving Vintage a newfound sought after look! The collections include stunning silk Embroidered fringed Kimonos teamed with a customized original Chanel jacket. With an extensive range for all tastes and eras of vintage fashion, from a Yohji Yamamoto faux Fur jacket to a 1920’s beaded flapper dress and everything between the 1920s to the 1990s. Originating in their native New York, through their loyal client base they are now expanding into an international brand.

ROUGH UK: How would you describe your brand and customer?

MORPHEW: We have two different types of customer; our first has a very strong fashion sense and zest for fashion and life. The other is the woman who admires the vintage look,and also appeals to women who have a sense of history!

R.UK: In what direction would the brand like to go in?

MORPHEW: We hope to expand by having locations in Los Angeles and London

R.UK:What was the idea/inspiration behind the brand?

MORPHEW: Well we have a very art background I was born in the UK and brought up in Canada. My family was from New York and I went to school in Florida so very cultural and arts background, visited lots of museums my mother always carries two pairs of earrings in her purse you know she is that kind of woman.I have a lot of influences growing up around those different tastes and cultures and this is reflected in the Morphew brand.

For me it’s not about the labels as such it’s about the history of why they were wearing at the time and what was happening to women in that era. That’s what defines vintage fashion for me and that’s my passion. The world is a very sad and ugly place and we want to make it prettier one piece at a time.

We have such a rich history of the past, which I love sharing and awakening people to the beauty of bygone eras. So that it is inspirational to the future generations. That’s what drives me to bring it forward to the public.

SOFIA HÄRDIG HITS THE STREETS WITH NEW SINGLE

Sofia Härdig has undone the nicely tied bow on her new single Streets. It opens with distorted guitars and her voice that pouts and purrs in spurts, then coos and roars in others. Streets is a midtempo passionate rock burner. Drums tumble. Guitar shred. But the star of this track is Hârdigs vocal performance.

There are moments when she submits herself to subdued, intimate phrases; gentle confessions like “To the day, we are…” And then in others she hollows out long pained notes that reach deep into her gut to pull out honest emotion. And the opening riffs of the guitar are like the garnish to this plate she serves scorching hot.

What are the streets? “Sky above. Streets below. Echo in your name…Leave it to the other girls.” The streets are heartbreak and disappointment. And when the drums pick up and a series of backing vocals haunting support Härdigs lead, theres no denying the streets are memories of some foolish lover.
Sofia Härdig is yet another brilliant export from the flock of Scandinavian gems. Her 2-part EP The Streetlight That Leads To The Sea releases later this year. Hear The Streets here first.

VAGABOND IN AN INSTANCE

If you are an art lover, you know that there are some very good exhibitions that you may miss simply because the gallery may not be in your neighborhood. Well, Oana Damir created Vagabond gallery with that in mind. That and allowing young artists a platform to present their art works and give them the exposure they deserve. Damir understands that galleries today come and go very quickly, artists and art graduates struggle more and more to earn a living in their chosen path, and art institutions loose funding and support more and more. 

You see, Vagabond is a mobile gallery, a curatorial platform, aiming to showcase artistic work on a regular basis, in various venues across the South of England and internationally. The gallery is represented by a series of shows in which emerging artists are the opportunity not only to present their works, but also to engage with the local creative community to network and revitalize the arts scene. When you think about it, really, it is a win-win opportunity. Even if you are not an artist, you may realize that inspiration is all around you, that you may find inspiration in everything, and the interaction with local communities certainly qualifies as “inspiration”. The community, of course, gets to enjoy the beautiful art works, but also to understand where the artists find their motivation and form of expression, and perhaps also be inspired. 

This November, the gallery will be displaying ‘INSTANCE’, a selection of photographic work by 12 artists, themed on identity, the humanity revealed and the connections between new media and technology, art and artificiality. An indirect dialogue is formed between the artworks, and it correspondingly projects the thematic in subject. 

‘INSTANCE’ features work by Kristina Collender, Stella Asia Consonni, Anastasios Gaitanos,Johnny Horgan, Christopher Lanaway, Georgie Mason, Joseph Mayers, Robert Nemtanu, Dainius Sciuka, Russell Squires, Jennifer Welton and Luisa Whitton. It is the first exhibition to be presented within Vagabond. 

The exhibition will take place at 101 Reykjavik Icelandic Kaffibar, between 22nd and 30th November 2014. You are invited to join the curator and the artists on the launch night for the celebration event, on the 22nd November, starting at 6 PM. 

Come and show the artists your support, and aim for a wonderful evening of art and soul.

MODERN PANIC IV

Prepare to be shocked, to be disgusted, to be perplexed and to be amazed. The exhibition Modern Panic IV will undoubtedly evoke a million different feelings amongst its visitors. It showcases a wide range of paintings, sculptures, performances and films that all have one thing in common; they all demonstrate the theme of panic, guaranteeing that Modern Panic IV is much more than just an exhibition; it is an experience. ROUGH UK sat down with the curator, James Elphick, in an attempt to get into his head and gain a better understanding of this highly unusual and yet spectacular exhibition.

ROUGH: Please tell us about the concept of the exhibition Modern Panic, and about what you wish to communicate through it.

JAMES: Modern Panic is inspired by the 1960s Parisian Panic Movement. A group who concentrated on chaotic happenings containing performance art and surreal imagery, designed to be shocking, as a response to surrealism becoming petite bourgeoisie and to release destructive energies in search of peace and beauty.  Modern Panic is about a new wave of provocative, controversial and surreal modern artists, whose work has something to say and can resonate with the viewers.

ROUGH: You are featuring several artists, many of which are very different. Based on which criteria did you choose the artists?

JAMES: Alongside inviting a selection of artists once a year I run an open call for international artists to participate in the exhibition. This year we will feature 40 visual artists, 10 filmmakers and 20 live arts practitioners. The work usually speaks for itself and stands out, this year we had an overwhelming response and the standard was very high. It was very difficult to select the finalists!

ROUGH: What is it that fascinates you personally about the panic movement?

JAMES: In 2009 I curated a multi event season about Alejandro Jodorowsky who was one of the founders of the Panic Movement. He went on to create some of the greatest cult films which took the energy and vision of the performance art and surreal imagery and combined it with alchemical, esoteric and philosophical elements to create a type of film that wanted to heal its audience. I find the concept of art that can heal fascinating and I try to explore this in the work we exhibit. Beneath all the provocative, controversial, political, social and morally questionable work lies a question to the viewer, to see what they find acceptable in themselves, hold the mirror up and to them ask why.

ROUGH: What should the visitors expect from this exhibition?

JAMES: Art to hate, art to love, art to shake you awake and art to take with you forever!

Visiting Modern Panic IV is an experience that you shouldn’t deny yourself. The exhibition runs till Sunday 17th November in Apiary Studios in Hackney, London. For more information, visit www.guerrillazoo.com/modern-panic-4.

THE ACTIONS RESOUNDING ECHO

Maybe you’ve seen them. The Actions: London based alternative band supporting iconic US band Green Day while on tour. Yeah maybe you’ve seen them. And even if you haven’t, now’s the perfect time to get hip to something fresh from the duo. They’ve teamed up with producer 3dtorus for their new single Echo.

The result is a cinematic soundscape brimming with crashes and rushing waves, airy synths, dynamic percussive sounds, and a haunting voice that seems to float over it all like an out of body experience. It’s not rock. It’s not alternative. It’s hypnotic electronic music. It’s 2 remixes from the rock star of a producer/remixer 3dtorus that has given the duo some electronic street cred if I ever did hear of some.

Silty and Mo went back to the drawing board and fleshed out what is certainly a new sound. The single is proof of that. The Driving Straight remix is lush with hypnotic synths and Silty’s ethereal vocals. The beat is understated but cinematic enough that it just might creep up on you when you least expect it. The overall ambience is nothing short of otherworldly.

Then there is the Moving Slow Edit. It’s dark. It plays at half the speed. It coos with wind sounds, synths that wax in and wane out, and 808s built for busting the speakers on any dodgy home stereo. It’s a crusty, crunchy sound that is so sexy you won’t know what to do with yourself when you hear it.

The contrast between the two mixes is night and day. One is a glass of red and a strong Cuban cigar. The other is a double vodka martini and a Marlboro cigarette. And both are just what the music doctor ordered.

BEAUTY COLOUR YOU.

  • With each season Maybelline seems to be revelling beauty products that really overcome my expectations. This New York company takes you to the trip to its city of origins. Truly attractive, fun and quality cosmetics that is also friendly to your wallet. Let me share with you my recent discoveries.

Its been only a few years that Ive started actually using lipsticks. And, just as every other girl, I like my lipstick to stay where it meant to – on my lips. Maybelline offers you Super Stay 14hr lipstick. Okay, lets admit it – it doesnt stay on for 14 hours exactly, but it does meet requirements to be called long-stay lipstick. Besides it has this very light formula that doesnt weight you down, instead you feel bright, fun and without having that feeling like you have too much cosmetics on you. Ive got Never-ending pick shade, but I really am looking forward to experiencing more bright, super rich colours. No fading, no dragging, no letdowns – all together – great lipstick!

For the eyes, I suggest The Rocket Volume Express Mascara. It has that Jet Glide brush with very neat Flexi-fine bristles that load on big bang volume and doesnt create any clumps. Eye lashes look sleek, smooth and even, without any efforts. This is one of my favourite mascaras this season, and it also comes Waterproof which makes it perfect for travelling to warm countries, so your eyes look just as brilliant after the pool and sun exposure.

But my gold medal goes to Superstay 10hr Tint Gloss! Now that one really lasts a while, even with eating and drinking all day long it still pulls through. Beautiful, soft and pleasant texture, youll want to use it again and again. Lasting colour. Vibrant sheen. The only thing is that it comes only in 5 shades, but I assure you that these shades are quite ultimate and even though its not a big choice youll still find at least one that will appeal to you.

So, how about me and you discover more of Maybelline – just because were worth it!

COSMETIC BY MAYBELLINE
  • Photography – PHILIP SCOTT
  • Conceptual Stylist – CUBA CHARLES
  • Make Up Artist – PIPPA CROSS
  • Models: NINJA @ STORM MODELS, ANTONIA & LYDIA HUNT @ M+P MODELS.
  • Special Thanks to TESTBED 1 (http://www.testbed1.com)

LAURENT DENIMAL

What was the first photograph you ever took?

At  a early age, during the 70’ – I was given  my grand-fathers rolleiflex (He was a
doctor, I never met him, but my father told me he use to photograph alot of family  life, specially with
medium format, and my mother kept a camera body of his work  after his death in1962).
I can’t remember which picture it was I took, but under the supervision of my mum, I
was 10 years old. I still use the camera today, for portraits of writers and also for a  project Im  working on,
about ”Saint-Valery-sur-Somme” in the north of France.

Talk us through your creative process?

Keep moving!
The camera is a tool, photographys has been part of  me ,in my dailylife since i was  10 years old, after
I went to study  photography in Stockholm, Sweden, where I live.
even when doing th odd  jobs, I  made it a habit to document my dailylife, at my
jobplace, and make books of the pictures.
Like in ”Tour de Stockholm”, a bike messengers diary through the streets of
Stockholm, all the photogrpahs were taken with an analog Olympus Mju-II, exclusivly
b&w rolls, shooting from the saddle.
Like in ”Millesgården”, as I worked 4 years as a gardener outside Stockholm, carriyng
a plastic camera from the 50’ in my  pocket (Vredeboch Felica, medium format), all
year round, keeping my eyes open, taking  snapshot.
Like in ”Djurgården” (a project still in progress),  I worked 7 months in an other
park, located in the city centre, having a polaroid camera 600 by hand, and shooting
the daily life in the garden, 1, 2 or 10 polaroid images a day.
As I was actually employed to do a specific job, I had to find a tool which is discrete,
easy to use and cheap. I love books, and love to see my photographs in book form – I did it with Tour de
Stockholm and Millesgården (Carlsson editor), I am working now on a book about
Djurgården.  I like to explore new format, new cameras, new films.
I bought the camera I use for ”Millesgården” for 2,5 €! That’s the funniest! The film roll
is more expensive,  I don’t realy  care.
All these projects don’t give so much money att all – but that’s not the meaning for
me.
The purpose is to create nice composition / photographs, to tell a story, the story of a
place and the people working there.

Which fellow photographer would you like to collaborate with on a project ?

Daydo Moriyama

What types of people inspire you to take their photograph?

The poor, the honest, the humble.
In fact, the people or the situation I am confronted  with, the person close to me and my travels through China, India, the Middle-east – just walking the streets and being there, watching the landscape, the people, looking for the right
moment, inspire me alot

Why do you think your work have this untold story which feature so often in your
images?

Poetry is a kind of untold story – i see the subject as it is wihout changíng nothing in it.
Just press  snap away  ,as I crossed South India , walk the streets of Beyrouth or
Damascus, the same spontaneity, the same concentration, the same presence of
mind. It’s about photography, and a bit about meditation too.

Which do you prefer; photographs whose subjects are contrived or spontaneous?

Spontaneous! The expression of life, no preparation, something happen, you’re just
there, the photography is in front of you, you see and feelit and its gone, you a have a few second
to react, you have to ”act” now, NOW, and you do it. Spontaneity!
No more thinking. See Cartier-Bresson, again and again. Everything is there.

What is it about black and white imagery that speaks to you ?

The infinity of gray, all between black and white. I love developp my photographs in
the dark room, it’s a moment of grace. B&W is elegance and refinement.

If you were on an island and you were allowed one item what would t be and why?

A bottle of Gigondas 2007.
(I was thinking first of a Leica M6 loaded with a tri-X to keep the eyes in action, but
what could I do if there is no darkroom on that island?)

What inspires you to create?

Photography is a kind of therapy – keep creating, as your questioning yourself, and
follow the infinity of the situations which occur.

ROBERT FRANK RETROSPECTIVE – RAINDANCE FILM FESTIVAL 2013

Film Festivals are all about celebrating film, and about looking into the future by screening upcoming films and welcoming new filmmakers. However, before we let ourselves get carried away by all the film debuts and UK premieres that are taking place at this years Raindance Film Festival, let’s turn back time about 60 years and focus on a very fascinating movement: the Beat generation.

This year’s Raindance Film Festival celebrates the Beat movement through three events that feature the work of acclaimed Beat generation film director Robert Frank. These events carry title “Robert Frank Retrospective”, and the first took place yesterday on September 29th. So why has Raindance chosen to focus their attention on Robert Frank and the Beat generation? Well, the answer is simple, and is best described by the introduction of the yesterday’s event: “Let’s face it, this particular generation of filmmakers are cool, and Raindance is cool”.

“Robert Frank Retrospective – Programme 1” featured three very different short films that all show exactly why Robert Frank is considered one of the most influential figures in photography and film. The first film was “Pull My Daisy” from 1959 that is an exclusive look into the soul of the Beat generation. It’s written and narrated by Jack Kerouac and features other important members of the Beat generations inner circle, such as Allen Ginsberg and Gregory Corso. The second film on the programme was “OK end here” from 1963, a beautiful short film that tells the story of a day in the life of two disconnected lovers from New York City. The last film was the experimental and non-edited documentary “One Hour” from 1990 that takes the viewer on a trip through New York City’s lower East Side.

Robert Frank Retrospective – Programme 2 takes place today, September the 30th and Programme 3 will take place on Wednesday October 2nd. Robert Frank Retrospective – Programme 2 features the three short films “This song for Jack”, “Energy & how to get it” and “Conversations in Vermont”, while Programme 3 is a screening of Frank’s first feature length film “Me and my brother”. For more information visit raindancefestival.org.

HOW TO MAKE MONEY SELLING DRUGS // RAINDANCE 2013 KICKS OFF

Yesterday on September 25th, the curtains rose for the 21st annual Raindance Film Festival. Running from September 25th to October 6th, the film festival offers 12 days of independent film, each day with an absolutely packed programme that offers something for every taste. It all started off with yesterday’s opening gala that featured a screening of the highly controversial documentary “How to make money selling drugs”.

The founder of Raindance, Elliot Grove, took the stage as he presented the opening film, as well as the festival in general. Grove, who initiated the festival 21 years ago, spoke of how much time has changed since the first festival, creating completely different circumstances. 21 years ago when the first ever Raindance Film Festival took place, everything was screened on 35mm film and the advertising strategy was limited to printed ads in Time Out. Time has changed, and now everything is digital. Not only does Raindance welcome these changes, they also approach them by asking the question, “are these changes for the better?” Through a number of seminars and panel discussions, Raindance try to get to the bottom of it.

And now to what it is all about, film. And not just any kind of film, independent film. With the opening screening of “How to make money selling drugs”, Raindance proves that this year’s festival is not to be missed. The film is a ‘how-to’ guide, setting up ten steps on how to make money by selling drugs. Featuring celebrities such as 50 Cent, Susan Sarandon, Woody Harrelson and a number of extremely charismatic former drug dealers, this film is most enjoyable, hilarious and very thought provoking. Do not get me wrong, “How to make money selling drugs” is not just an entertaining film on how to make it in the drug industry, it has a very serious purpose. In the most sarcastic way imaginable, this film criticise the US’ war on drugs and its many consequences.

For more information on the films shown at this years Raindance Film Festival or to get a look at the exciting programme, visit www.raindancefestival.org.

BELLERUCHE – GOING WITH THE FLOW

Today Rough has a soulful surprise in store for yall. Weve got DJ Modest from the three piece electronica slash soul outfit, Belleruche giving us the gooses on their humble beginnings, new album releases, and all things arty and a little bit weird.

For those not in the loop, Belleruche formed back in 05 and have been blessing our cochleas with a wide range of musical leanings ever since – showcasing at festivals from electronic through to jazz.

Theyve had a very notable progression toward the well-rounded feel of their latest album, having sold an all-time record number of sales for the label “Tru Thoughts with their debut album Turntable Soul Music, and garnering a decent following across Europe along the way. Whats best about this band is the ease with which they adapt and embrace new forms of expression – they certainly know how to go with the flow!

So, without further ado, we bring you the inner workings of the creative talent that is Belleruche.-

Hi guys, great to meet you, hope 2012 is treating you well. 
You recently had quite a long tour across the UK, has this been your most prolific excursion in regards to touring, and how did it go?

Modest – Hi, likewise, thanks for asking us questions. The album tour was the longest weve done to date, we had 30 dates in just over a month, so it kept us moving. Its a bit of a blur really, there were some stand out shows, Berlin and Newcastle were really good crowds. Every night is different, its a bit of cliche but you never know what the nights going to be like until you get onstage.

Tell Rough a little bit about the history of the band and how you guys came to be.

Modest – We started about 6 years ago, with just Ricky and I making strange guitar, bass, turntable and sampler noises in a pub in North London, someone offered us a gig, so we had to think of a name. We then met Kathrin, who started coming to these interminable jam sessions we were having, she somehow found a way of seeing through the 10 minute riffs we were playing and we started writing songs.

We did this for a bit, playing every Sunday in the pub, and then started getting offered gigs elsewhere. Then, mainly because Id wanted to since I was 13, we pressed a 7″ record. Thankfully we managed to sell them, and more quickly than we imagined, which meant we did another two 7″s on our own label, before Tru Thoughts bought us a coffee and promised the moon on a stick.

Youve been quoted describing your sound as “Turntable soul” which was also the name of your first release, what is this?

Modest – Weve always struggled with the taxi driver question – when you are getting into the cab, carrying some case of other you get “so youre in a band eh, what sort of music is it?” We thought inventing our own genre was a way of answering the question  without answering it really. I think if you can really specifically define what it is you do, musically, then it must be quite boring, Im always interested in music that sounds a bit different, and hopefully weve tried to make some too.

What were the trials, joys and tribulations involved in getting your first release into the light of day?

Modest – a high, or low, light would be hand screen printing 1000 7″ sleeves for our second release we did ourselves. In my kitchen. We recorded most of the early songs on my old PC too, which only allowed you to listen to around 40 seconds of a track at a time whilst working on it, which certainly helps hone your arrangement skills.

Which artists, musical or otherwise, do you glean inspiration from?

Modest – too many to mention, Ive been buying records since I was 12 and have been continually discovering new things since. Currently Id say Brother Ali – on Rhymesayers records, just because his new album has just arrived in the post, and James Yorkston, because Ive been listening to the 10th anniversary of Moving up country a lot recently.

Since your first release Youve released three more albums, your fourth Rollerchain is out now, its a very soulful experience to say the least! Tell Rough about your influences and thinking behind this latest project. How does it differ from your previous releases?

Modest – Its the one we had the best studio for, certainly. Id say we spent more time crafting the sound of this record, taking time to mix and master it properly – we had our own schedule for this album, and I think the time taken in the way we built the songs shows. I think it sounds very different from quite a lot of other stuff, but thats probably a feature of most of our music, in that it sounds different from the rest of it,

Ive seen the video for Stormbird, the track is very cool! Explain the creative process behind making the video and the message you wanted to convey here..

Modest – Basically its a longwinded advert for matches, or a in depth critique of modern politics through the medium of contemporary dance. Or it could have been that the director said “Ive got a good camera that we can edit backwards, and two mates who can fence, whaddya say…” It looks nice though.

Whats the chronology to your creative process when making an album: is there a magic formula in regards to the vocals influencing the melodies and  vice versa?

Modest – Not really, most of our ideas come from difference starting points, whether its a guitar line, or vocal refrain, or sampled loop – normally what starts something isnt what finishes up in the recording, but thats the only part of the process that could be described as a formula. Were not really good on planning to be honest

How do you function together when recording material and playing live? 

Modest – Live = beer. Recording = tea and coffee.

Im sure youve heard the whole Portishead reference in regards to yourselves, no doubt youll hear it again! How do you feel about this comparison, does it hold any water in regards to your musical style?

Modest – Whilst its very flattering, they wrote some amazing tracks, and sold a lot of music, I dont think there is that much in the comparison beyond that some of our music has scratching on it and we have a female vocalist. I think its a little bit lazy, but music journalism is basically creating little boxes to write about, and I guess wed fit in to a box with that sort of sound in those terms.

Your music is quite engagingly eclectic, from electronic to blues to hip hop to jazz. is there any correlation between those different genres or do you just go with whatever feels right?

Modest –  Feels right is about it really, as I said were not good at planning, weve never said we want to make something that sounds like this or that. I think to do so is a bit dis honest really, and whenever I have tried to make a sound that is in one direction or another, it always goes off in a completely different track. I guess Im more interested in sounds than genres, I think Ive given up trying to understand genres.

How do you keep your style fresh and relevant, morning prayers to the gods of innovation, perhaps?

Modest – I think if it doesnt feel fresh and interesting, you dont do it. Music making should be fun, interesting and novel, otherwise youre just working, and there are far more lucrative ways of working if its money you want to create, rather than ideas. So go to a charity shop, buy three old records, cut them into thirds, stick together, play backwards, sample and play glockenspiel over the top….

What would you say have been your career highlights thus far?

Modest – mastering the last album with Transition studios in London was great, to hear what wed spent so long worrying on making sense in their studio, and then cutting it to vinyl was really quite an experience.

If 2012 does herald the apocalypse, what are you aspirations for 2013, have you a new project in the works?

Modest – Apocalypse permitting, Im building a new studio in my new house by the sea, which is quite exciting. Just try and make new things I guess, no plans beyond that.

Now a few random questions Im sure your fans are just itching to hear.. Whats your Favourite fictional protagonist and antagonist from any movie or novel?

Modest – Harry Palmer, in The Ipcress file.

Favourite non-fictional protagonist and antagonist from the planet Earth?

Modest – Three, if allowed, Peter Sellers, Hunter S Thompson and Buck 65.

Best loved band in your teens?

Modest – Not a band but a record label, Rawkus, in that short golden period of independent New York hip hop that came about in the late 90s.

Most remembered teenage heartthrob, famous or otherwise

Modest – not a usual question!… dunno, hard to recall really, probably the girl singer from Veruca Salt – around the time they released Seether.

Thanks for the honest answers guys, its been a pleasure, and Rough would like to wish you all the best for the future!

You can catch Belleruches latest gig here. In the meantime why  not stream  Stormbird  above..

ROUGH UK EXCLUSIVE ONE-ON-ONE WITH ANDE BISHOP

Ande Bishop has been steadily gaining recognition from some of the biggest names in Hip Hop. The producer turned rapper has managed to create a buzz around his name with his debut EP ‘Ocean$’. Through the underground success of the EP, Ande Bishop has been a guest on one of the most oldest and illustrious Hip Hop radio stations in the States, Hot 97, and has seen the likes of Rick Ross show his music some love via social media. We sat down with the Southern rapper, to see what he makes of his musical journey so far and his plans for the future.

ROUGH UK:  How did it feel to see your latest single ‘Old Jay Z Videos’ get such a positive response from an artist like Rick Ross?

ANDE BISHOP: It was really dope, Ross is one of my favourite rappers ever, and to get his attention was one of the most gratifying moments of my career so far.  Ive had people from his label reach out to me before, so it wasnt super shocking, but still fulfilling nonetheless.

R.U :  What made you decide to start rapping rather than just stick to producing?

A.B: I felt like I had to test myself, production is cool, but I wasnt feeling challenged by it anymore, and I had a plethora of good ideas Id been sitting on, so I decided to release a few loosies, and the reaction was genuinely surprising, so I decided to go full steam.

R.U: Which artists would you compare your sound to?

A.B: Its so early in its hard for me to say.  Ive heard I sound similar to Big Boi from Outkast, Isaiah Rashad, Falolous, even T.I.  But I dont hear any of them, but they all influenced me at some point.

R.U: How did it feel to get invited on to Hot97? Did you feel validated as a rapper?

A.B: It was amazing, my labelmate Londn Blue made Hot97 last summer during his False Hope campaign, so I knew it could be done.  But to make it myself was crazy, and theyve reached back out again for my next single, so Im excited.
Ande Bishop – ‘Old Jay Z videos’

R.U: We hear the Ocean$ EP was recorded in a really short space of time. Tell us about the process.

A.B: 

It was a long 3 days, I really just got the urge to compile the EP and make it cohesive as possible.  It turned out good, based off of the reception and new fans Ive gained, but with my next release Im going to really take my time, probably take about a month and really think it out.

R.U: They have attracted a lot of public attention to all the various releases including your own. Is the fanbase mainly in the South, or does it appear to be wider than that?

A.B: Yeah its spreading faster than we imagined, we have a nice sized European fanbase as well.  Id say the cities we seem to have the most fans in would be Houston, Atlanta, and London.  Ive had several people from the Carolinas start to follow me as well.

R.U:  Any other artists to look out for?

A.B: Yeah, the other 3 guys on the roster (Play, Tajee, and Londn).  All 4 of us have a release planned for the summer, so were praying for a real breakthrough to who our sound reaches.

R.U:  Any plans on releasing an album at some point?

A.B: Oh yeah, of course.  Not this year, just EPs and Mixtapes, I dont feel like Ive found my sound enough to put an “Official LP” onto shelves yet.  But I do know itll be titled “BISHOPIZM”, which is an ode to Erykah Badus “BADUIZM”.  I know for a fact thatll be the title of my first full-length LP.
Ocean$ is available on iTunes.  Make sure to follow Ande Bishop on Twitter @Ande_Bishop.

FINE ART FILMS BY DRYDEN GOODWIN – RAINDANCE FILM FESTIVAL 2013

This year, Raindance Film Festival celebrates 21 years of independent film. But on the last day of the festival, Sunday October 6th, Raindance took it one step further by celebrating art film as well. To be more specific, Rainance took part in 25 frames – a programme of screenings and events celebrating 25 years of Film and Video Umbrella, when they screened a selection of the work of artist Dryden Goodwin.

Dryden Goodwin took the stage as he presented some of his most notable works, including the two short films “Closer” and “Poise”, both of which are commissioned by Film and Video Umbrella.

“Closer” is a exciting art film that explores the encounters we have with strangers in public places, which Goodwin puts on the edge through pointing a laser pen at these people. When presenting the film, Goodwin explained that he got the idea for it on a night he was walking in the streets of London, and suddenly realised that someone was pointing a red laser pen directly at him. This experience of a stranger deliberately pointing him out, without him knowing anything about who this person was or even what he looked like, gave him the idea to investigate it through film. The result is both fascinating and thought-provoking.

From focusing on complete strangers, Goodwin takes his art in another direction with the short film “Poise” in which he centres his attention on a group of young female divers. The film is extremely detail oriented and by shooting it in extreme close ups, Goodwin presents a different and much more intimate side of this otherwise fairly known discipline.

For a sneak peak of Dryden Goodwin’s short film, “Closer” from 2001, click here. And to watch the trailer for “Poise”, Goodwin’s 2012 short film, click here.

MS. HENRIK – 1994

I’m a sucker for a synth-pop song, so when I listened to Ms. Henrik’s new single, 1994, I knew I would enjoy it on some level. However, I didn’t expect to enjoy it quite as much as I did.

Following the trend of successful and talented Swedish pop-stars, Ms. Henrik delivers. 1994 is an electro-pop fest, with a strong message behind it.

The support for LGBT has risen in the past couple of years, and only recently America legalised same-sex marriage in all 50 states. So it’s only natural that songwriters show their support and involvement with the LGBT community.

1994 was inspired by a 75 year old man Ms. Henrik met. This man had a wife and kids before coming out as gay. As well as that, Ms. Henrik has appeared at Stockholm Pride, and 1994 features on Songs With Pride.

The song is full of summery fun, with a 90s pop feel. It’s an enjoyable listen and a good sing-a-long song.

ROUGH UK EXCLUSIVE WITH UP & COMING AMERICAN RAPPER BUGGS

ROUGH UK sat down with up and coming American rapper,Buggs, to talk about his new project amongst other things. Buggs has been on stage with the likes of Hip Hop heavy weights such as Talib Kweli and Hi Tek. He has also received recognition from Pharrel Williams and a host of other Hip Hop superstars.

Hailing straight out of Ohio, Buggs has been making waves in the underground scene in the States which has caught the attention of many in the industry. He has been on tour in Europe and has even collaborated with UK artists, however little is known about him over here in the UK. I gave Buggs a chance to introduce himself and his body of work.

“With my first mixtape I got a lot of national exposure, it was called “Hip Hop Supa Hero” with DJ Mick Boogie. Hes now known as MICK and is a Roc Nation DJ but is also from Ohio.’”

He added: “I then dropped mixtapes  primarily until “Mutant Level 5” which featured Little Brother, Sa-Ra, Freeway, Londons SAS and more. The Lost Luggage mixtape and then Wrath of Zeus in 2013 both with DJ Clockwork got a lot of national attention as well. Now its time for the new upcoming project “Scattered Thoughts of an American Poet” releasing on December 10th” His latest project was released this month, Buggs gave us a quick synopsis about the project and what were some of his motivations behind the new album.

“Its literally just my scattered thoughts and bringing people up to speed on what I been on since my last project. Its also showcasing who I am as an artist and person to the new audience. I wanted to show my depth in music and give variety while staying true to who I am and I did that with this project.”

The album showcases his creative side as he blends spoken word with Hip Hop. Buggs’ creativity has also garnered him recognition from his home town of Cincinnati. The city awarded him the best Hip Hop act of 2014 a feat very few artists can boast of and goes to show the wide appeal Buggs has. The mid west rapper had this to say about the award.

Its always a great thing to be recognized for your hard work and talent, especially as its the people of the city who voted for me and they felt it was deserved.” On his use of poetry in his work the Ohio native had this to say:

“Most rappers dont appreciate connecting with souls through words, they are mostly concerned with making a dance tune or pop tune that can produce money for them and their bosses at the label. Its not about connecting with the people or affecting people in a way to change the world. Most people in the rap realm treat this like a hustle, another quick lick to make some fast money, but not me. Music is a passion of mine. I would do this regardless, its my therapy, my everything!”

The production on some of the tracks is perfect as he makes use of some great soulful samples which help to set the mood; ‘Against me’ highlights this best. Unlike many Hip Hop artists it doesn’t seem like Buggs allows for the beat to take centre stage on the track as he actually has lyrical content. In a time where it seems the catchiest beats make or break a Hip Hop song I asked Buggs his opinion on whether or not he thinks there is a balance coming back to Hip Hop as more lyrical artists such as J Cole and Kendrick Lamar are gaining mainstream recognition. He said:

“I love this question, honestly I feel more needs to be done not only on the artist side of things, but the consumer plays a large roll in correcting the issue as well. If you let the record labels feed you bullshit they will keep giving it to you. The machine is only concerned about what is making dollar signs! “He added,

“I think personally the overall problem in rap music is that theres not enough balance on mainstream radio and tv. Its hard to hear the artist providing hip hop lyricism because the labels are trying to keep the underground music down.  Its a constant battle since the rise of indies, they have been trying to make it even harder for indies to blow up as thats cutting the labels money out. Of course everything is a business at the end of the day.”

Ohio has always had a rich history of iconic rappers, from Bone Thugs n Harmony to more recent acts like Kid Cudi. However it doesnt seem to share the same level of success as its other Midwest neighbours such as Chi- town and Detroit. I posed this question to Buggs so he could give some insight into this anomaly.     

“Ohio isnt a place with very many outlets to be successful. Most of the people…well scratch that….all of the people who were successful from Ohio had to leave to do so. I dont fault them for that. And if the OGs and others  before me had felt a responsibility to showcase and shine light on Ohio, we would be successful as Chi-town or the D. Unfortunately we havent been as lucky in that aspect, but if I have the opportunity I will change that and show them all what they should have done. “

It is this need to be different, to be a trend setter, that really separates Buggs from a lot of up and coming artists. You get a sense of someone who is trying to change the rules of the game from the inside and doesn’t use the lack of radio play or label backing as a crutch. It was this energy I believe that appealed to mega stars such as Pharrel and Talib Kweli, the latter being one of the gate keepers of Hip Hop culture.  Buggs speaks on the chance to work with a Hip Hop icon like Talib Kweli.

“Its amazing to work with Talib in any capacity. He is a legend and one of the greatest lyricist that hip hop has ever seen. To be co-signed by him and share the stage with him is a surreal feeling, its something epic. But we linked up as Donte from MOOD and I opened up for him,  we already had a few mutual people between us, and I think it was just one of those things where I was making noise and people were telling him about me.“  He added:

“So he finally gave me a listen or two, saw a live show and then he reached out to me. He gave me a call and we linked up in Cincinnati at this lounge weve been rocking ever since. “

Not just content with having some of Hip Hop’s biggest stars wanting to work with him, Buggs has also ventured overseas to pursue his music and linked up with London’s very own SAS. While he was in the country he had time to experience our brand of Hip Hop and had this to say about it,
“I love the UK the scene. Its amazing and I feel the appreciation of lyricism in hip hop over there way more, even in your mainstream, thats the energy I get. I like a lot of different kinds of artists over there, but Ella Eyre and Sam Smith are two I would love to collaborate with!”

Scattered Thoughts of an American Poet is out now on iTunes and make sure to follow Buggs on twitter @BuggsThaRocka and Facebook BuggsThaRockaMusic.

A TALK WITH DIRECTOR ARTHUR WOODCROFT

Watching films directed by Arthur Woodcroft transports an individual into a world which we can say only Arthur could create his style is very distinctive yet so simple in its process .we are please to show an exclusive film made by ARTHUR called SCARF  ROUGH haven the pleasure  speaken with this talent who is a force to be reconde with .

What can people expect to see from your work

Id like to think something different. Something that makes people pause and reflect. Theres a lot of amazing film work going on out there right now so I need to stand out from the crowd.

At what age or time In your life did directing cross from a hobby to something more serious

Its been an ambition since I started my career as a photographer. Only until recently has there been such a change in the technology that has made directing a realistic goal.

What and when was your first action of pursuing a directing Career

Once I started playing with early Phantom cameras that was it for me. I totally fell in love with seeing objects and effects moving in super slow motion.I began testing with a company who could supply the latest high speed gear and we took it from there.

How would you define the actual role that a director is supposed to fill

Without wanting to sound cheesy I guess you have to be the eye of the storm. Its an incredibly difficult role to both control the running of the shoot and the crew plus keeping true to the artistic intention. It probably gets a little easier as time goes on and Ive been very lucky to have had some great help and guidance so far.

Would you say you have a signature directing style and creative worK process

I think every creative does. Everyone has different references and ways of understanding. Its just a matter of having the courage to stick the course with a particular style.Finding that style is the really hard part. Especially taking into account the cost of running a shoot.

Relatively how hard is it to ` make it ` in the directing world , and what skills help this

I think its becoming harder and easier at the same time. Its so much more accessible now but this gives way to much greater competition.You have to be able to communicate withe a great variety of people; sometimes simultaneously.Having a clear vision is the key however. Being able to be flexible without compromising your vision only helps further.

What projects have you got coming up right now

That would be telling!

What would you say is your greatest accomplishment as a director

Working with my production company to create treatments for some big clients was a real challenge but felt great presenting to the clients.And being interviewed by ROUGH magazine!

What is the best advice you could give someone new to filmmaking

Dont get scared of the technology and if you have a good idea just go for it!

ROUGH UK TALKS THE HIDDEN SECRETS OF THE MEDITERRANEAN WITH TINA PENCINGER

Not much  is really talked about when it comes to fashion,talent and creativity with the Mediterranean side of the world. The West and pretty much the rest of the world somehow seem to not pay so much attention.
The Mediterranean as we have discovered is hiding a lot of non-discovered and talented fashion designers. It is about time that these unheard of talented creatives had their work exposed to the world to see. As Tina Pencinger puts it They need a push, a bit of the wind in their sales, to spread their talent around the world Tina is a fashion blogger who recently launched her fashion blog,  GOLDEN MED GIRL www.goldenmedgirl.com which is  solely dedicated to all things fashion when it comes to the Mediterranean. She hoping to use this newly launched platform to create the awareness and fiercely promote  the fashion talents and lifestyle in that part of the world which to her sometimes feels its either forgotten by the West.
It is also important to note that Tina through her blog aims to address her audience all around the world of the love for the uniqueness of style and fashion of the Mediterranean people which is linked to their sense of life. ROUGH UK delves in more in this exclusive Q&A with Tina
TINA PENCINGER: I follow fashion since I was a little girl. I was collecting Vogue magazine for years and since fashion and lifestyle blogs have appeared Ive been following it. At some stage, I have decided to write a blog and I do it in English to spread my fashion thoughts from Mediterranean to the rest of the world. I simply found a niche while researching the Mediterranean market. I live at the shore of Adriatic Sea as the part of Mediterranean. We simply live the Mediterranean life, we breathe it, we feel it. I thought why people around the world could not discover more about it through my blog.
ROUGH UK: Do you think the Mediterranean has a potential to have a bigger influence in worlds fashion?
T.P:  Definitely. The Mediterranean has a potential to leave a bigger trade in worlds fashion. As the entire world comes to Mediterranean for holidays and many even stay to live there, we should use that advantage in the area of fashion. There are numerous non-discovered fashion designers and artists that find their inspiration in Mediterranean. They just need a small push from their nest to make something big. Maybe even my blog could be a platform for them to present their work to the world. I always loved progressive people with original and creative ideas. They point themselves out among millions of others. They show how important their personality is and how different they area from copy/paste ideas from many shop windows. I find myself different and unique and I am trying to present such people on my blog.
ROUGH UK: Still, is Mediterranean fashion and lifestyle changing under influence from outside the region or it is still enough exotic and original?
T.P:  From my point of view I would say the Mediterranean lifestyle is changing. People in Croatia, for example, could not wait for Scandinavian company Ikea to come to Zagreb. They were waiting in queues to buy furniture. Architecture is also changing under influence from the rest of the continent. Fashion in Mediterranean sometimes becomes boring and of a mass production. There is no much individuality and personality.That might be one of the reasons why I decided to launch the blog to scream to the world that there is still some originality and magnificent beauty in Mediterranean. One needs only to find it, to discover it. And, here I participate from my side to help in that sense.
ROUGH UK: Is there a lack of projects in the Mediterranean area that connect Mediterranean as a region?
T.P:  Yes, indeed. When I think of Mediterranean there are very few projects that put the Mediterranean together as a region and to have a joint presentation towards the world. I know there were Mediterranean Games,then some other smaller projects. There is also Mediterranean Fashion Prize organized by Mediterranean Fashion Institute in Marseille. And thats it. Designers, models, artists, journalists, bloggers, entrepreneurs and others that participate in creating a lifestyle of 19 Mediterranean countries should cooperate more in presenting their work through joint projects. Thats to digitalisation the world is small, the life is fast and if better connected we could together do much more. And that way would do it on an easier way.

IN FOCUS: HOLLY FALCONER

Holly Falconer is a photographer who documents the daily grind in an extraordinary way. Her sharp imagery, and use of eye-catching backdgrounds have an intense and distinctive palette. Fully engaged and intrigued, ROUGH simply had to get the low-down straight from Holly herself.

Where are you from?

A place with more sheep than people called Painswick, in the West Country.

What was it like growing up there?

It was actually great – much better than being a city kid in some ways… My teens were a mixture of cider-fuelled field parties and cheesy but hilarious clubbing in local towns. I remember pouring over magazines like the Face and i-D with my friends, craving more access to gigs etc… but mainly it was pretty fun.

When did you first get into photography?

When I was a child – my Dad had an old Canon SLR from the seventies and I used to play around with it, snapping my sisters and friends. I just always remember getting a kick out of it…

What does photography mean to you?

I like the way its an art form thats deceptively immediate. On the one hand, youre building an illusion of documenting a fact, but its also very much a personal myth-making perspective on a friend or situation. I come from a very Christian background, and I used to stare at the stained glass windows at church for hours – theyre basically amazing gaudy ads for saints. Now, I try to play on that with my work – why not make idols out of your friends? Or make celebrities look as normal as possible?

Does your personality come out in your work?

Yeah I reckon so! Ive always been a bit of a daydreamer – my pics seem to end up having an escapist feel to them. Im pretty fun/ have a good-ish sense of humor etc… this feels like a personal ad so Ill stop there…

What are your influences?

Absolutely everything. I think Celine Dion once said that she avoids listening to other peoples music in case her own songwriting gets tainted. Which is hilarious.

My friends especially – sometimes a day hanging out with your mates can be just as inspiring as going to a gallery…

What themes would you say are constant in your work?

Finding beauty in ordinary things, always avoiding a conventional perspective on a situation/ idea, and COLOUR.

What to date would you say has been your best/favorite piece of work?

Ive always loved this portrait – “Sho”, 2010. In some ways, its a very traditional portrait – shes surrounded by her possessions like some kind of traditional painting of a merchant surrounded by his wealth. Ive photographed her in quite a “feminine” way too: its shot in a very soft light, and she almost looks coy. But nothing is quite perfect – the flowers arent full-grown and faultless like the seed packet sign, shes got a skull on her arm, and the window next to her is cracked. Im not a fan of the prescriptive, Disney woman – every little girls bought up on that ideal. Hopefully shes giving a little “fuck you” to that cliche in this image.

Has your work been compared to other artist?

Not as far as I know…

If you werent doing this what do you think you would be doing?

Id be a journalist, thats what I originally trained for, but I got distracted along the way…

What projects are you working on at the moment?

A project on asexuals – I hope to show it next year, its just about finished. Its been so interesting documenting a group of people who are so opposite to our sex-centric society.

Where do you see yourself five years from now?

Doing what Im doing still I reckon! Id like to live in New York and Berlin at some point too…

ROUGH UK DELVES INTO ITALIAN FASHION THROUGH THE EYES OF ANDERSON

Top – Bottom:  Kilesa | Daisy Milano | Antipina | Aelenore Research

I have been taught never to allow myself to be a captive of the environment I find myself, for a while now I have become a willing slave to my captors. I don’t want to ever be free; the world of my captors has become my world and their family, my family. Like sin, this place, the journey has become part of me it will take only a miracle to shake me off from this spell that I love and makes me feel like the place I used to live where we were all little

Here I have found my vocation. Pursuit and pleasure. All in all this really is paradise except for one thing, desire is desire wherever you go, the sun will not bleach it nor the tides wash it away.

It is the freaking “made in Italy” effects, for some people it is all about the tangibles, the high quality made in Italy bags, shoe, clothes and the tasty food. For me is about the emotion the feeling you get from smell of a natural tan leather from Tuscany, the wake to the aroma of coffee from a coffee shop in Napoli, the feeling of happiness when you touch and feel genuine silk fabric in Como, the feasting on the large table with friends with each one of you laughing and helping each other out on the feasting table. This, is made in Italy; it is an emotion, an experience, but to the Italians it is a way of life, and these experiences is an infusion of history, love, happiness, culture all embedded in an edible bite, or in a shoe, a bag, a cloth so you feel the emotion, an experience you will never forget. I call it the made in Italy effect.

So when next you are in Italy do not be satisfied with the tags on that eye catchy bag, feel the emotions, feel the love, the years of experience put into creating that piece that have caught your attention, try to imagine the laborious hands putting the pieces together, be inspired.

Talking about being inspired Italian brands inspiring people with their stories and helping people go through emotional journey by aiming at perfection are:

Kilesa.

Kilesa is end product of a passionate search for balance and beauty in a product that is elegant and refined. It present itself in extravagant colour and it is imaginative; each piece is a luxury item that best help determined women with self-confidence.

Website:Kilesa.fashion

D’ASY Milano.

D’ASY Milano bags is a class without any ostentation; it is the current reinterpretation of the classic and custom, set out to deviate from pre-established models her designs are timeless and epitomize ‘made in Italy’. The brand is created by two friends who are inspired by the world of art and myth.

Facebook:D’asy Milano

Antipina.

The ANTIPINA BAGS is as embodiment of poetic curves and rustic antiquity, it is an expression of a woman’s passion and her inner beauty inspired by the beautiful city of Florence.

Website: antipina.it

AELEONORE Research.

AELEONORE Research represent the classy Italian style it marries tradition with contemporaneity classicism and avant-garde design, the brand puts materials at the forefront to create a collection of bags and accessories that possess a fresh and extremely personal aesthetic with a strong ethos for made in Italy.

www.aeleonore.com

One advice, FEEL ITALY!

HORS SENTIERS BATTUS IS AN OFF THE BEATEN TRACK SOUNDTRACK

Guillaume Ravau, French filmmaker and composer, has unveiled the soundtrack to the first season of his adventure series HSB (Hors Sentiers Battus). Much like the series which sees Ravau traverse the most exotic points of the globe from the cushioned seat of a 4-wheeler, the soundtrack is hypnotic escapist fare. Imagine cool jazz impressarios like Dave Koz or even pop instrumentalist Kenny G venture on a camping trip… in the middle of Almeria. This is what it sounds like.
The melodies are light, upbeat and conservative piano compositions which see Ravau demonstrate his virtuosity in crafting an image visually and audibly. HSB is a feast for the senses.
The series itself is riddled with majestic images of all the bucket list places any traveler worth his or her weight in customs stamps would salivate over. It bursts with colors and wide sweeping angles that give the viewer an uncommon perspective on some equally uncommon destinations.
To get a taste of what the series is like, check out the trailers here

ROUGH UK BEAUTY: LETS TALK CHARLOTTE TILBURY…

Image credit source:   Harpers Bazaar, Pinterest

It is safe to say Charlotte Tilbury is fast becoming one of the biggest beauty brands on the market right now. Her range of stunning, luxurious beauty products are sought after by more and more women everyday. From her exquisite matte lipsticks to her blushing palettes, there will definitely be something you will want.

Now who is Charlotte Tilbury? Well, a make up artist of course. Tilbury grew up with her parents Patsy and Lance in Ibiza were she spent all of her younger days, until she was 9 years old when she came to England and resided at a boarding school. This was where Tilbury first got a taste of the make up industry.

“Makeup literally changed my life. I put on mascara and the whole world’s reaction to me changed. I remember feeling kind of hurt about that. And then I realised, actually, I’m just like everybody else.”- Charlotte Tilbury

She first properly experimented with make up when she attended Glauca Rossi School of Make up in London. She was lucky enough to shadow make up artist Mary Greenwell as her assistant, where she learnt many things. After years of experimenting, in 2012 she created a how-to YouTube channel where she provided video tutorials on applying different beauty products in her own signature way. Once she had gained a strong following, in summer 2013 she decided it was time to launch her Charlotte Tilbury make up collection to London Selfridges. The company itself was only founded in 2011 with a few investors backing her brand. Some of the products in her collection she had previously used on models backstage at fashion shows she had attended. She now travels far and wide to many red carpet events, fashion shows and advertising campaigns to style the faces of the models and her collection can now be found in many places, including Harvey Nicholls, John Lewis and Net-a-Porter.

“I remember she used to babysit for Penny Rich, who was a beauty editor and so she had all these cosmetics at home,”said her mum Patsy.    “Shed give them to Charlotte, and Charlotte would do makeup for all the girls at school and then sell the rest off for pocket money. She was always very resourceful. You cant keep those redheads down.

There are no negatives with makeup, only positives,”says Tilbury. “None of us are perfect, and thank god. But why not look as gorgeous as you can possibly look? Actresses and models know that looking the best they possibly can will increase their success. I want to bring that awareness to women everywhere.”

My favourite products from the CT collection are:

Charlottes Magic Cream– A cream made by Charlotte herself and originally used backstage on models. Amazing for dry skin that needs revitalising leaving skin looking fabulous.

B*tch perfect lipstick – A creamy stain finish formula lipstick with warm pink and coral undertones leaving lips smooth and hydrated. It applies perfectly on the lips not leaving any heavy marking.

RAW SKIN

Yesterday ROUGH headed down to the Raw Skin exhibition at London’s Karin Janssen Project Space. Spring finally made an appearance so it was only necessary that we made the most of it! Raw Skin was odd, freaky, strange but at the same time disturbingly beautiful. The exhibition ‘challenged the dualistic view that the body is merely a seat for the mind.’ It delved in and researched what takes place when the ‘internal emotions start bleeding into the body and clash with the world around it.’
It featured the works of five contemporary artists. Firstly Chiho Iwase who unravels the personal discomfort and juxtaposes feelings of both comfort and distorted. Eliza Bennett whose work explores the continuous conflict that takes place between physical appearance and the values of inner self. Next I witnessed the works of Karin Janssen, again a little bizarre but explored the conflicts that the body has with the mind and the ways in which the private emotions can clashes with the external and these emotions become visible. The bold brush strokes and bold colours of Edith Meijering’s paintings unravelled the dark side psychological condition. Last but not least (my personal favourite) the photographic series of Antony Crossfield.  Crossfield blurred the boundaries of the body and the individual selves. He uses photo-manipulation and the hybrid bodies are literally fused and joined at the hip. His work constantly challenged the viewer’s gaze as you continue you notice that the bodies are isolated and each setting and surrounding is both dark and tragic.
Raw Skin did not disappoint! It challenged you to delve into the unknown. The aim was to question traditional conceptions of corporeality and our understanding of the body. However it was not for the squeamish or the faint hearted!

VITRINE PRESENTS HARIBOY BY PHILLIPA HORAN

London based Phillipa, who studied at Central St Martins and Chelsea College of Art and Design, has exhibited internationally. Her solo shows have been presented in London, Berlin and Hong Kong, whilst her recent group exhibitions include ‘Peeping Tom’ at KAdE, Amersfoot, Netherland, and ‘Rob Pruitt’s Flea Market,’ at the Tate Modern in our capital city.  However her creative abilities stretch beyond just her artistic brilliance as she also has strong links to music and fashion.; we caught up with Phillipa, late Alexander Mcqueen’s muse to talk on her new collection:

Phillipa the t-shirts are fantastic – what was the inspiration behind them?

The image on the t-shirts came from a 3 meter oil painting that I began as part of the Score series. It hasnt been an easy decision to show it but I thought if Im going to exhibit a figurative nude it has to be of a male, which unfortunately is still a spectacle in art. Art history and contemporary culture are saturated with images of nude women. I walked around the National Gallery yesterday and noticed how it contains many paintings of nude women, such as Francesco Hayezs 1850 painting of Susanna at her Bath and Diego Velázquezs The Toilet of Venus, but noticeably fewer of the male nude and certainly none by female painters. There is something very beautiful and contemporary about the long-gone and restored slashes inflicted by the suffragettes on to such paintings, such as Mary Richardsons Fontana-like slashes to Venus back in The Toilet of Venus. They remind me of the metal staples and instrument strings that I use to perforate my own canvas. The Haribo sweets themselves function as runes, even amulets, of a sugar rush pop culture ejaculating spectacle. Nudes of any description were rare in seventeenth-century Spanish art, which was actively policed by members of the Spanish Inquisition. These days we have no such official inquisition but the male nude still remains hidden away, as if deemed offensive or lewd, whereas the nude female graces every fashion magazine, tabloid, top shelf and billboard around the country. There is nothing wrong with this per se; whats wrong is the inequality.

ROUGH loves the fact that you can move and detach the Haribo is it important for you to allow buyers to express themselves through the t-shirts?

Its great to be able to contribute to a work of art, not through vandalism like Mary Richardson but by having the rare and novel freedom to put your individual fingerprint on a work.

VITRINE Bermondsey Street is committed to presenting emerging art practices.  Was this an important factor when making the decision to work with them?

I think modern is more important than emerging, art that evolves and discusses what it means to be an artist and to display and exhibit art in progressive and critical ways. I had a studio that was once an old butchers shop in the Blue market in Bermondsey around the same time that Vitrine started. I would curate exhibitions there, so I have a

shared context and geographical connection with the area, its locals and its artists, and I recognised a similar mentality in Vitrine.

Hariboy is part of Score.  How long have you been working on this?

My whole life. All my work is a by product of thoughts, conversations and experiences that have taken me a lifetime to accumulate.

Are you looking forward to exhibiting at the infamous Saatchi Gallery?

Yes of course, its a different and new platform for the work.

You have exhibited all over the world.  What has been your favourite place?

Bermondsey street of course!

Your artistic talent is very unique.  Does your personal fashion style reflect this?

Ive been told by friends who work in fashion that nobody would wear the clothes that I do, so I guess so… I think it was a compliment?!

What are your favourite sweets?

I dont eat sweets anymore, but I love the way they look.

‘Hariboy’ is part of ‘Score’; a body of work produced by Phillipa Horan that will be available to view at Saatchi Gallery later this year.

ROUGH UK ONE-ON-ONE WITH MARIA FRANCESCA MILANI

 

Maria Francesca Milans motto is “live your life with humor, and a little bit of seduction”. Maria, a talented Italian designer,  created a brand that is all about  catching an experience and conveying it in the most original and suggestive shapes. Pouring her heart and soul into her collections, Maria creates the most femenine and exciting creations that empower women at every age. Maria has agreed to take some time to answer ROUGH UK quick Q&A.

ROUGH UK: Thank you for taking the time to answer our short Q&A. your Carousel of Life collection is full with wonderful prints and vibrant colors, constructed shapes and expressive textures. You were inspired by the many faces of a woman, at every age and the real essence of being a woman. How would you describe The Woman of your brand? Who do you design for?

MARIA FRANCESCA MILANI: In my collections, as you already said, the protagonist is the woman and her thousand faces .In Carousel of life I chose as inspiring muse Cecilia Matteucci Lavarini, a famous Italian fashion collector, because thank to her charm embodies the stereotype of woman i want to dress.

For me woman lives life with humor ,without giving up to seduction , wearing clothing that recall lingerie . A mix between vintage and modern, sportwear and haute couture, blended in an explosion of colours , for elegant woman but at the same time free from any society prejudice. Differently , shapes are inspired from iconical apparel of a tribe in Senegal .

 R.UK:  What is your inspiration for your next collection (2016)? What influences you?

M.F.M: For the new collection chic & shock I was inspired by a travel I took to New York ; I was  inspired by the American contemporary art, by geometrical shapes of the city, by a so urban style, that is so fashion and shocking at the same time. Eccentricity and simplicity that show in everyone the chic side of night life (elegant and glamour ) ..I found the right mix of elements that connects to my initial concept of style contamination .. I used it and i translated all these new styles mixing them thanks to my personal experience, touch.New York for me is life, i feel her strong and full of personality. What I want to communicate through my fabric printings is just this. Simple cuts, few tissue, overlap, the minimal, but at the same time something chic and sophisticated, taking care of each minimum details, of finishing, embroideries,
fabrics.

R.UK: How do you incorporate your rich Italian heritage into your designs? How do you mix that distinctive romantic and elegant, and oh-so-chic Italian flare and charisma with your designs and with modern shapes and fabrics?

M.F.M: For the creation of my collections I take my inspiration from the Ancient  Italian tailoring  tradition, in order to produce unique and customized clothing . To have a more fresh and contemporary mark, I enrich my clothing with embroideries and feathers. My idea is that of melt different styles in the same product, to combine the comfortable, practical style and something  that is elegant, glamour and exclusive at the same time , to allow every woman to be well dressed in each situation . This line has been designed for all-day woman , sporty and practical but also glamour and rebel .
R.UK: Can you describe your creative process? How do you transform an idea or an inspiration into a work of art, into a creation?

M.F.M: My projects springs up in the daily life, when I walk through the city, when I work ,when I play with my nephews… Its like an interior journey, a deep travel in my emotions , as joy, sadness, euphoria , anger.. I combine all these emotions and I connect them to a specific historical period, a strong concept, thanks to i convey all my feelings. Inspiration may start from an ethical tribe , or an important moment in our history or simply from our actuality. Then, ahead of my sheet I start drawing what I feel within. Sometimes my drawing dont have an immediate meaning , sometimes my ideas are immediately clear .

R.UK: What are your plans for your brand for the coming years? How do you see Maria Francesca Milani in 5 or 10 years from now?

M.F.M: In 5-10 years I see the realization of my dreams, a consolidated company,with the introduction of kid and Men collection
R.UK: What would be a normal, regular day at the office? What do you do when you first come into the office in the morning?

M.F.M: My working day is completely out of the office. I usually wake up early and after a quick bath and breakfast I go out with Viktor,  my lovely dog,to have a walk . This is a relaxing moment in which i only look all around me , to caught urban life around me , simply source of inspiration for me and my creations .Then I plan my visit to fabric companies , looking for exclusive and original materials , able to give a shape to my ideas .

Sometimes I only want to escape from ordinariness and I go to the train station and I take a train ,without a planned destination . Sometimes I visit other cities or visit Museum , Art galleries or fashion exhibitions , to keep me up to new trends. In the afternoon , when I come back to my office I make a rough sketch of new models and i let my emotions and ideas drive me to the final result .I think that office is not the best place to work , i.e. I love to draw on a train, in a bar, on a park bench.

R.UK: Whats on your playlist when you are designing?

M.F.M: When I create my collection usually I create in my office a relaxing atmosphere , thanks to natural sounds , or sometimes i listen music ,without genre preferences. So I can escape from the reality , melting my soul and my emotions in an unique project.

ROUGH MIX 001: MILES SIMPSON/ THUNDER

The basement clubs of Dalston are ablaze with essential small clubnights right now: quality bookings and residents, late hours with tiny entrance fees. In the thick of this is underground house night Thunder. As they warm up for May’s party with Patrice Scott, resident Miles Simpson talks us through what makes him tick and hands us an exclusive ROUGH Mix. 

Who or what are your influences?

I guess there are loads of them. I’m a nerdy fan of the history of DJing and I like to think I’m always learning, taking a little bit of inspiration from everyone good I hear, be that pure technique, how a set is knitted together or the injection a bit of raw drama. But my biggest influences were probably two friends, Ipen and Dave Otzen, Danny Rampling and Tony Humphries.

Ipen and Dave are old school friends, who got into DJing in the 1980s through hip hop, entering DMC and stuff like that. They were and probably still are the most technically gifted DJs I’ve ever met, with that natural flair that you can’t learn. I’ve collected records since I was a kid but the idea of playing them to other people came from them. Ipen still plays down in Brighton, where he lives, but Dave has packed it in, and is now Brad Pitt’s dresser!

When I graduated from acid house raves to Soho clubs in the early 90s, Danny Rampling was the DJ I drew most inspiration from. People talk about there being less genre pigeon-holing back then but that’s mainly crap – DJs were generally associated with particular niche genres. Rampling really did play from a broad palette, happily chucking New Jersey garage in with Belgium techno and Spanish acid, with Chicago house and Balearic pop chucked in for good measure.  It rubbed off a lot and led to my mish-mash nature of record collection, which is definitely more mongrel rather then purist.

Through Rampling I first heard Tony Humphries play and he really turned me onto US house, which previously I had associated with the like of CJ Macintosh, i.e. slickly produced and dull. Humphries had a rougher style that struck a chime with me and really injected energy into his sets with his mixing. I still feel that’s important – music is important but mixing should add something to what you’re doing, even if it’s not so neat and technically perfect. I won’t name names but some of the smoothest beat mixers are also the dullest – give me Humphries chucking records he bought that day together and then working them hard on his Kiss Mastermix show everytime. He’s my all time favourite DJ, for sure.

More recently, people like Neville Watson, Dan Beaumont, Legendary Children and the other two thirds of Thunder, Rick Hopkins and Joe Apted, keep my enthusiasm levels up with their energy and appetite for house music in all its forms. That is probably inspiration rather than influence though.

Best DJ gig

One of the more memorable was Bam Bam in Birmingham – partly because it could have been the worst. I traveled up one bank holiday weekend with Bill Brewster, Jolyon Green and Toby Tobias and big bunch of various mates, so the pressure was on to be fairly decent. I was on before Bill in what was really the first ‘peak time’ slot, so an expectant crowd waited. Bam Bam had a bit of reputation for slo-mo house (Mark E played there quite a bit), so I planned to take it down in a slo-mo style to start with, a plan I stuck with.

Suffice to say the Bank Holiday party crowd weren’t up for the slo-mo shuffle and buggered off en mass next door to the pub to listen some bloke playing disco re-edits, leaving me with a handful of dancers. But the people that stayed were into it – one almost having a fit because I played a DJ Rush at 33rpm, making it sound fairly demented – and slowly it built back up, record by record, dancer by dancer, until 45 minutes in, it was packed, people hollering and screaming, dancing on top of things, Sylvester records causing mayhem, and the transformation was complete.

I like to think that the early part of that set was a palette cleansing exercise but in reality I almost emptied the venue… something I’m sure my mates wouldn’t have let me forget if I hadn’t have turned it round.

And worst

I quite enjoy most places I DJ, so I’d nominate the time I played Disco Bloodbath not because it was a bad gig – it wasn’t, it was fantastic – but because of my, err, unprofessional approach. It was another Bank Holiday, I’d been to the Notting Hill Carnival and then played at a post-Carnival party in Kensal Rise before heading over to Hoxton for Bloodbath. By the time I got there it had been a long day and I was, to coin a phrase, ‘tired and emotional’. Dan welcomed me, showed me round the larger than I expected venue and it was bloody packed with people dancing. He then suggested that I DJ straight away. I was unsure. When I got into the booth I was even more unsure because I was struggling to see the mixer properly and as you can imagine, the DJing that followed was less than perfect. All was not lost though – I sobered up as my set wore on, people were into the music and eventually played for about an hour longer then scheduled. Lesson learned though – being a lightweight and DJing dont mix, literally.

What are you currently listening to?

Old house, new house, in-between house. I’ve got quite a few records and I like to ensure that there’s a good range of ears in every set. Nothing worse than a well worn classics set but equally, someone who’s just gone into Phonica and bought 20 ‘on trend’ records off the wall then cobbled them together is pretty boring too. I guess depth and authenticity is what you’re after from a DJ set, so I’m constantly listening records to makes sure I play stuff that isn’t obvious, that I didnt play the last time they heard me and that will make people dance. I’m also playing Semtek’s UKG influenced night, Special Request, soon, so I’ve been digging through loads of proto-UKG records – Mentalintrum, Zach Toms, Todd Terry, Marc Kinchen, Booker T, Ricky Morrison and that sort of thing. I know Todd Edwards is missing from the list – but I can’t bear his stuff. Actually, don’t tell Semtek that.

Describe a typical night at Thunder.

A proper party! I know that’s pretty clichéd but that’s what it is. A bunch of mates, many of whom we’ve met since we started, cool Dalston club kids, older heads, and maybe a few random stragglers, like the bloke in the blazer and his girlfriend who came by chance, stayed all night and we ended up leaving on the dancefloor of a Caribbean drinking den at 7am the next morning. We’ll make sure the music is spot on –  we’ve been booking DJs like Sven Weisemann and Patrice Scott, who you simply would not expect to hear play in a venue the size of ours, supported by the three residents, then we stick it all in a East London basement, shake it up and see what happens. It does tend to get a bit messy and guess if you don’t like that, dancing or staying up till the following day, it probably isn’t for you. Luckily lots of people do like it.

Dream guest?

Tony Humphries. But we’d need a time machine because the 2012 Tony Humphries doesn’t float my boat at all. That rawness, that energy, that edge he had is gone. I want the Tony Humphries who was at the epicentre of New York house explosion, the Zanzibar resident, the Mastermix king, the man who broke records for every producer in the Big Apple, the man with the hottest tunes, the sweetest skills – the DJ Tony was 20 years ago.

The time machine is still work in progress though, so until that’s sorted, DJ Nature, which is the recording alias of the now New York based DJ formerly known as Milo from the Wild Bunch. He’s taken that Humphries style and progressed it to where I think it should be right now – German techy house mixed with vocals mixed with stuff like Portable, chopped up disco breaks and World Unknown releases. He’s absolutely brilliant. Actually, I need to talk to Joe and Rick and sort that dream out…

Listen to ROUGH Mix 001:  Miles Simpson-Mixx For Someone A Little Faster below.

INTRODUCING JADE CHANEL P

Christmas is officially over. We have all consumed way too many calories and are all desperately ensuring that we adhere to those New Years Resolution. Here at ROUGH its business as usual and we thought we would kickstart with 2014 ones to watch.

Tattoos. Etched on every other young persons body. Once deemed to be a sign of rebellion and counterculture, inked skin has now become the new normal. Whilst we admire these works of art and frown upon those that look like a toddler has had their wicked way with a biro, we tend to forget the person creating these masterpieces. When we talk about pop culture in relation to tattoos self taught Jade Chanel is the name to be on everybodys lips. Trawling through instagram i stumbled across her work. Not only is she insanely beautiful  (that kind of beauty should be illegal ) but she has made a career by fusing her two passions art and tattoos. It was imperative that we feature Jade for our first tattoo artist/ illustrator. She draws inspiration from her friends and whilst most tattooists may dream of  tatting a celebrity the humble artist would love nothing more than to etch her dad who remains one of her biggest fans.  Her unique, signature style is dot work and this is something that we admired. Jade is modest and hardworking and this interview does nothing but reinforce that. O
Tell us a little about yourself? 
JC: My name is Jade Chanel and Im a self taught artist from London. I tattoo, draw, paint.. You name it.When was your first tattoo?
JC: I got my first tattoo a few days after my 18th birthday! I had tried to get tattooed previously but I was politely told to leave the studio as I was underage! HahaWhen did you become interested in becoming a tattoo artist?
JC: Ive always loved art. Its my “thing”. From as far as I can remember, Ive always known I wanted to be an artist of some sort. I wasnt sure what path I wanted to take. About 4 years ago I got my first big tattoo.. Thats when I knew tattooing would become a huge part of my life.

 How is it working in a male dominated profession?
JC: To be honest, it scared me at first! But in todays world, theres a lot more to be scared of other than men! HahaWhere do you find your inspiration for your artwork and tattoos?
JC: I would say my friends inspire me the most. I know quite a few creative geniuses! Not in my field, but that doesnt matter. We are always throwing ideas around, inspiring and motivating each other. Its amazing! “Team work makes the dream work!”
 What is your favourite tattoo and why?
JC: I love all my tattoos equally!I always think that tattoos are personal and have a meaning behind them. Would you say thats the case for yours? 
JC: Some of them are just there because of my love for body art. Some of my tattoos have meaning behind them. The one that means the most to me is my Artemis statue. She is the Greek Goddess of hunt, wild animals, childbirth, virginity and protector of young girls, bringing and relieving disease in women.If you could tattoo anyone who would it be and why?
JC: Id love to tattoo my Dad! He loves my work but he hates the thought of being scratched by needles for hours on end. Hes a super cool, supportive father.. But him being covered in tattoos by me would be so sick!!

What gets you in the zone before either doing a tattoo or creating a piece?
JC: Music. Its a big creative jam! Oh, and I always like to eat a huge meal first. Once Im in my zone, Im stuck there for hours!

How would you describe your tattoo/ art style?
JC: Intricate, crazy and dotty!

Do you look to the art world for inspiration?
JC: Of course.. I think collectively, we all inspire each other.

Is there anything you have wanted to tattoo but havent had the chance?
JC: I draw a lot of my signature skulls. Id love to tattoo them all!

Do you keep a sketchbook?
JC: I do. I use it to mock up ideas when im on the go, otherwise I draw on random sheets of paper.

What do you think makes a good tattoo artist? Any tattoo styles which you loathe?
JC: Patience, commitment, a good eye for what looks good, practice and the desire to learn. Tattooing is very time consuming.. Each design has to be perfect to produce the perfect tattoo. Its challenging, which I love!
Styles I loathe.. Tattoos done badly!

Favourite artist in the art /tattoo world?
JC: I have many favourites! Eric Marcinizyn, Lil B, Tamara Lee, James Spencer Briggs, Miguel Ochoa, Justin Burnout & Drew Romero! To name a few!

Were you an artist before tattooing or vice versa? Do you think one influences the other?
JC: Ive always considered myself an artist. Even now, thats the title I want to keep. If im not tattooing, im drawing, painting, making collages. I like mixing it up!

Your iconic style is dot work . Do you think you will ever consider a different medium and why is this your chosen style? 
JC: I kind of stumbled across dot work a while back when I was working on some neotraditional tattoo designs. I added dots, here and there as shading, and I loved how it looked. So I ran with it. New mediums.. Im working on some big canvas pieces. All will be revealed soon!

Instagram: @jadechanelp

CHIRPINGS BIRDSONG: A WARNING OF SORTS

Four piece outfit Chirping emerges with a lovely birdsong of sorts- “A Warning of Sorts” to be precise. It pulses at the vibrant speed of light with the uber uptempo drums and those crazily bright guitars.
Chirping’s new song hits us optimistically with a catchy refrain that asks “Wouldn’t you like to go, go, go?” It the top’s down on the convertible, the wind’s blowing through our hair and this lovely number is pumping from the radio– the answer is emphatically yes.

We’d love to go anywhere this band is serving up scrumptious musical dishes like this. In fact they have a few UK dates on tap. So there’s no time like the present to see what they’ve got brewing under the hood live in concert.
Seeing them live will confirm in your mind that they are every bit the breath of fresh air we heard beaming from our speakers in the office. They’re certainly a nod to 1975, Bastille and in my personal opinion the crazy good wave of cool UK indie bands that exploded in the early 2000s. They’re gentle, then they’re raucous. They’re friendly, and yet there’s some edge and spice to this catchy track. Simply put: we like them lots.
“A Warning of sorts” becomes available everywhere April 20th.

THE NEXT CHEREVICHKIOTVICHKI X YOHJI YAMAMOTO

If you thought the first collaboration of Cherevichkiotvichki with the Yohji Yamamoto for their Femme collection was a hit, think again. Victoria Andrejeva, creative force behind the utterly unpronounceable brand, Cherevichkiotvichki, and the high fashion Japanese house are working together on a first men’s footwear collaboration collection. Now that is sure to give the first collaboration a run for its money. 

The “Cherevichkiotvichki for Yohji Yamamoto” creations are made with the best of the old-as-time Italian craftsmanship and in the artful tradition of the of footwear crafting, combined with the technical palette of the “master tailor’s” new collection. The three hand-crafted styles of shoes and accessories complement and enhance the rough beauty of Yohji Yamamotos Homme SS17 2017 runway presentation. 

The capsule collection features two types of shoes and leather bracelets. Borrowing from the ladies, the favorite low derby shoe, presented for the women’s collection the previous season, got a manly-man make-over to complete the mens rugged look.  The second style, the mid-length boot, now comes in a traditional Cherevichkiotvichki walnut dyed canvas and heavily waxed camel hide with a front curved zipper. Oh, yum! 

You might have to wait a while before you can get your hands on these delightful babies. The collaboration pieces will become available only in early 2017 and will be sold exclusively available in the Yohji Yamamoto stores and selected boutiques. Though you might want to get in line or on a waiting list right now, though, because these will just walk off the shelves before they even get there, if we are correct. They got us drooling…

ROUGH UK EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH BRITISH BORN DESIGNER SCOTT FRASER SIMPSON

Scott Fraser Simpson is one of the few British designers whose products are 100% made in England. Having started in summer 2013, the Duffle Bag is just the beginning of the Scott Fraser collection, where multi- functional practicality is apparent. The ‘Retrospective Modernism’ concept is what influences the designer, as the heritage brand has a vintage yet modern feel. Exploring different materials, colour palettes and textures, Scott Simpson has a strong eye for detail which is reflected in his designs.

Men are increasingly focused on their appearance and Simpson picks up on that, by aiming to produce a collection that is suitable for all occasions. From work, to going to the gym or going to a bar, the gap between work and socialising is getting smaller for the modern man, and the Duffle Bag is just the start on catering for their needs. Adding a vintage vibe to a smart- casual clothes range, the Scott Fraser collection will be a clothing range that men will need to look out for. Plans to extend the Scott Fraser collection from bags to clothing are underway, and ROUGH UK gets an exclusive insight as to what we can expect to see in 2014.  You can view Scotts collection on  http://www.scottfrasercollection.com

 

Video Production – ANDREJ ILIEV

Conceptual Idea – CUBA CHARLES

Fashion Co-ordinator – STANISLAVA SIHELSKA

Interviewer – AMALY ALFI

ROUGH UK EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH CONSTANT DEVIANTS

With a career spanning almost 20 years rap duo, Constant Deviants have recently released their   fourth album in five years. Hailing from the east coast of America, the collective consists of M.I and DJ CUTT.  The pair came together in the mid nighties, an era many see as the golden age of Hip Hop. Since that time they have set up their own record label, Six2Six records, as well as continuing to work with other established artists.

ROUGH UK: Youve released your fourth album in 6 years.  What was the motivation behind “Avant Garde” and how do you feel it differs from your previous releases?

M.I. – The definition of Avant Garde is experimental art. We spent a lot of time last year in French Switzerland and France so thats where the French influence came from. This project was us combining our Golden Era sound with the newer sound bridging the gaps. If anyone knows about both audiences they know that can be a tricky task

CUTT – Since our roots are in the 90s our sound gets categorized as “boom bap”.  With this album we wanted to expand that typical sound. Through the concepts, to the samples we used, to the attention to the sonics.
ROUGH UK: How has the industry changed in their treatment of hip hop artists since you first got into the music industry compared to now?

M.I. – I think the biggest change is the internet. Its not just Hip Hop. I would say the music game is all messed up and you have to expand past selling music

CUTT – The “industry” was always about marketing and making a dollar. The problem now is that there is no cultivating or support for the artistry. There is no time spent perfecting your craft. They eat up and spit out one hit wonders.
ROUGH UK: Sadat X recently did an interview with Jack Thrilla stating he does ‘grown man’ hip hop in which he makes music for people of a certain age or experience in life. Would you say your music is also tailored to this crowd/audience or do you think your sound is more universal and can appeal to today’s young hip hop fan?

M.I. – Nah, I feel we can appeal to every audience. Thats the whole point. We definitely keep to our original sound because we have a base there, but any true artist wants to be ahead of whats going on and not stuck 20 years ago

CUTT – We really dont think about who our music is for. We do what feels natural to us. I think our music is relatable on all levels.
ROUGH UK: Side B shows a more introspective side of you, what was your intended message for the song?

M.I. – We have so many different sounds. Thats just one of them. People may not have heard some of our other stuff but we dont limit ourselves at all. Side B was just a small representation of our diversity
ROUGH UK: Do you agree that we’re seeing a resurgence of golden era hip hop, due to the rise of more lyrical artists like Kendrick Lamar and J Cole?

M.I. – If all you listen to is mainstream, then I guess you could say that. But there has always been lyrical rappers. That never stopped. Personally I dont feel they are a representation of the golden era. Most of their music sounds pretty much like everything else out to me.

CUTT – There are a few guys out there that may focus more on lyrics, but I wouldnt consider it a resurgence. I would like to hear more diversity in the beats as well.
ROUGH UK:  Would you agree that your style of rapping is boom bap, if not what would you describe it as?

M.I. – I would describe my rap style as Timeless.
ROUGH UK: What other genres of music have influenced you?

M.I. – I guess I would have to say what ones havent ?! I love music and I listen to all types. I grew up on Jazz, my father was a jazz musician. Im influenced by peoples creativity. Any form.

CUTT – I definitely was influenced early by 70s jazz and rock. Those were the records my dad played in the house. It has carried on into the beat making for sure.
ROUGH UK:  What do you hope to achieve with “Avant Garde”?

M.I. – Finishing an album worth listening to is an achievement in itself. We are already working on the next one!
CUTT – Hopefully it has something for the old and new listeners.
Avant Garde is available on iTunes. Make sure to follow  Constant Deviants on Twitter @CNSTN_DVNTS

ROUGH PROFILE – M+P MODELS.

ROUGH UK this month teamed up with models from M+P (Top – bottom) Colvin, Catia, Sang, Lin, Hugoand Irenka to get photographed exculsively for this monts ROUGH PROFILE. It was fun to capture the models in their own state of mind and candid form.  The shoot also features the different attributes and facets of the models which some how makes them individuals in their own right.

All clothing by BOLONGARO TREVOR

  • Photograpghy – PHILIP SCOTT
  • Styling –  CUBA CHARLES
  • Assistant Stylist – ISABEL WEEKS
  • Make up Artist / Grooming – SIAN DUKE  & KEIKO NAKAMURA

Models – Colvin, Catia, Sang, Lin and Irenka @ M+P MODELS.

MANHATTAN GOES BAGS TO THE FUTURE

Ah, what hasnt been said about the 80s… and what hasnt already been said about New York… Iconic decade, full of idols as Madonna and Michael Jackson, and Iconic city. The Big Apple, Manhattan. We can appreciate being nostalgic, going back to the future… or rather, going bags to the future, as Manhattan Portage calls their latest bags collection, which is as iconic as its inspiration, paying homage to its roots in time and in place.

Manhattan Portages four-piece 80s collection comprises bags come in classic designs for every occasion, with a fresh and bright color scheme and printed eighties-inspired lining in comics style, of milestones of the 80s  such as the Walkman, Rubiks Cubes, Cassette Tapes and Turntables. Ah, great times… 

The 80s Big Apple Backpack is a classic style must have, sits easily and comfortably on your shoulders carrying all of your essentials while you are running errands throughout town. It features spacious main zippered compartment, front roomy compartment with dual zippers for smaller items, easy carry handle on top of bag, padded shoulder lined with non-slip coating, and it is water-resistant. Perfect for city people.  

You dont have to be an ally cat to wear the Allycat. The ultimate hands free solution for commuters, the 80s Alleycat Waist Bag has an adjustable nylon strap with buckle closure, small zippered pocket on front for small items, zippered main compartment large enough for wallet, camera, iPod and other daily necessities and is water resistant. Perfect for riding a bike or freeing your hands to carry groceries, or your shopping, or a picnic basket on your way to the park on a sunny afternoon. 

This best stylish and practical accessory just perfect for spare change, keys, even jewelry and phone, the 80s Coin Purse is a small but versatile companion. Plus its pop vibe 80s memorabilia print is sure to put a smile on your face. 

And if it is a messenger bag you are looking for, one that changes its size according to your needs, go with the 80s Europa ipurse-friendly that doubles its depth by simply unzipping the surrounding zipper. It also has a unique back pocket which can be unzipped and reattached to rolling suitcases. 

Manhattan Portage is “an original pioneer of the authentic messenger bags which created a new, urban lifestyle and changed the face of fashion forever…  Manhattan Portage remains loyal to their NYC roots… the Manhattan Portage line has developed to serve all walks and runs of urban life… Manhattan Portage owns “New York Tough.” Its become part of our history and its in our DNA”. 

Well, now you can go bags in time to the iconic 80s and feel in New York everywhere in the world.

ROUGH UK EXCLUSIVE: INTRODUCING NICOLAS ARNAUD – A FRENCH COMPOSER LIVING IN UK, MAKING MUSIC FOR AMERICAN FILMS.

Nicolas Arnaud is a young French composer and multi-instrumentalist focusing mainly on music for film, TV shows, advertisements, video games and other audiovisual media. After receiving classical piano and guitar training in France he has moved to London, where he graduated from music technology in 2011. His unique, contemporary cinematic approach has allowed him to cooperate on a variety of film projects; using his versatile skills to embrace different styles and genres.

His music style is characterised by emotional intensity, yet it has a distinctive dreamy quality. Expressive percussions, unusual sounds and unexpected rhythmical changes are all parts of his trade mark. Technically brilliant, Nicolas often uses classical piano and strings, as well as progressive rock guitar and electronic sounds. The mood of his compositions varies from existential sadness, suspense and horror in drama to sheer playful happiness of children’s music.

Why did you choose making music for film and media opposing to e.g. being in a band?

Being in a band is not as varied; most bands usually choose a style and stick to it in order to fulfil the fans’ expectations. What I like to do is experiment – and making music for movies forces you to do just that – to go out of your comfort zone and explore new styles and genres.  I also like to work by myself and make the score as good as it can be

What makes composing music for film special?

I would say it is the unique relationship between the music and what is actually happening on the screen. As a musician, you want your work to be heard, but you have to understand, that the music is only one element of the narrative. The main focus should be on the story. The music is only here to help telling that story – whether it is to express emotions, or suggest something.

Tell us about your work process.

Before I start composing I try to listen to other soundtracks or similar genre to put myself in the right mood. I also record myself whistling any ideas of melody or themes. That’s also the time when I may choose the instruments I will use.  I like the first demo I send to the director to be quite advanced already, so they can get a close idea of the final result.

You made music for the film The Shooting of Barry Miller, which was premiered last year on a film festival Dances with Films in Los Angeles. Do you cooperate with many American filmmakers?

Surprisingly yes. That’s the power of the internet. You don’t need to move to Los Angeles in order to work on an American film. The best is when the director, who already has some kind of idea how the music should sound, contacts me at an early stage. I like to see the script, or the rough cut to get the feel of the movie.

As a composer you must perceive music differently than a laic fan; what kind of music do you enjoy listening to?

That can be really varied.  I would like to mention 3 people that I admire.

Alexandre Desplat, a French composer, whose first success was a comic song in the 80ties and is now scoring big budget movies.

Vladimir Cosma, who was classically educated and has scored classic French comedies for decades. He is very gifted in making catchy melodies with grandiose orchestration.

Trent Reznor, who comes from rock music and has recently composed electronic soundtracks to films The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo or The Social Network.

What would you like to say to aspiring filmmakers?

Original music score can add a lot of value to your film production, especially if you are not completely satisfied with your visuals – getting the right composer and right music can really make a difference.  Try to think how your favourite movie would look without its score to understand the importance of soundtrack.

For more info visit http://www.nicolasarnaud.com/

 

ROUGH MIX 001: MILES SIMPSON/ THUNDER

The basement clubs of Dalston are ablaze with essential small clubnights right now: quality bookings and residents, late hours with tiny entrance fees. In the thick of this is underground house night Thunder. As they warm up for May’s party with Patrice Scott, resident Miles Simpson talks us through what makes him tick and hands us an exclusive ROUGH Mix. 

Who or what are your influences?

I guess there are loads of them. I’m a nerdy fan of the history of DJing and I like to think I’m always learning, taking a little bit of inspiration from everyone good I hear, be that pure technique, how a set is knitted together or the injection a bit of raw drama. But my biggest influences were probably two friends, Ipen and Dave Otzen, Danny Rampling and Tony Humphries.

Ipen and Dave are old school friends, who got into DJing in the 1980s through hip hop, entering DMC and stuff like that. They were and probably still are the most technically gifted DJs I’ve ever met, with that natural flair that you can’t learn. I’ve collected records since I was a kid but the idea of playing them to other people came from them. Ipen still plays down in Brighton, where he lives, but Dave has packed it in, and is now Brad Pitt’s dresser!

When I graduated from acid house raves to Soho clubs in the early 90s, Danny Rampling was the DJ I drew most inspiration from. People talk about there being less genre pigeon-holing back then but that’s mainly crap – DJs were generally associated with particular niche genres. Rampling really did play from a broad palette, happily chucking New Jersey garage in with Belgium techno and Spanish acid, with Chicago house and Balearic pop chucked in for good measure.  It rubbed off a lot and led to my mish-mash nature of record collection, which is definitely more mongrel rather then purist.

Through Rampling I first heard Tony Humphries play and he really turned me onto US house, which previously I had associated with the like of CJ Macintosh, i.e. slickly produced and dull. Humphries had a rougher style that struck a chime with me and really injected energy into his sets with his mixing. I still feel that’s important – music is important but mixing should add something to what you’re doing, even if it’s not so neat and technically perfect. I won’t name names but some of the smoothest beat mixers are also the dullest – give me Humphries chucking records he bought that day together and then working them hard on his Kiss Mastermix show everytime. He’s my all time favourite DJ, for sure.

More recently, people like Neville Watson, Dan Beaumont, Legendary Children and the other two thirds of Thunder, Rick Hopkins and Joe Apted, keep my enthusiasm levels up with their energy and appetite for house music in all its forms. That is probably inspiration rather than influence though.

Best DJ gig

One of the more memorable was Bam Bam in Birmingham – partly because it could have been the worst. I traveled up one bank holiday weekend with Bill Brewster, Jolyon Green and Toby Tobias and big bunch of various mates, so the pressure was on to be fairly decent. I was on before Bill in what was really the first ‘peak time’ slot, so an expectant crowd waited. Bam Bam had a bit of reputation for slo-mo house (Mark E played there quite a bit), so I planned to take it down in a slo-mo style to start with, a plan I stuck with.

Suffice to say the Bank Holiday party crowd weren’t up for the slo-mo shuffle and buggered off en mass next door to the pub to listen some bloke playing disco re-edits, leaving me with a handful of dancers. But the people that stayed were into it – one almost having a fit because I played a DJ Rush at 33rpm, making it sound fairly demented – and slowly it built back up, record by record, dancer by dancer, until 45 minutes in, it was packed, people hollering and screaming, dancing on top of things, Sylvester records causing mayhem, and the transformation was complete.

I like to think that the early part of that set was a palette cleansing exercise but in reality I almost emptied the venue… something I’m sure my mates wouldn’t have let me forget if I hadn’t have turned it round.

And worst

I quite enjoy most places I DJ, so I’d nominate the time I played Disco Bloodbath not because it was a bad gig – it wasn’t, it was fantastic – but because of my, err, unprofessional approach. It was another Bank Holiday, I’d been to the Notting Hill Carnival and then played at a post-Carnival party in Kensal Rise before heading over to Hoxton for Bloodbath. By the time I got there it had been a long day and I was, to coin a phrase, ‘tired and emotional’. Dan welcomed me, showed me round the larger than I expected venue and it was bloody packed with people dancing. He then suggested that I DJ straight away. I was unsure. When I got into the booth I was even more unsure because I was struggling to see the mixer properly and as you can imagine, the DJing that followed was less than perfect. All was not lost though – I sobered up as my set wore on, people were into the music and eventually played for about an hour longer then scheduled. Lesson learned though – being a lightweight and DJing dont mix, literally.

What are you currently listening to?

Old house, new house, in-between house. I’ve got quite a few records and I like to ensure that there’s a good range of ears in every set. Nothing worse than a well worn classics set but equally, someone who’s just gone into Phonica and bought 20 ‘on trend’ records off the wall then cobbled them together is pretty boring too. I guess depth and authenticity is what you’re after from a DJ set, so I’m constantly listening records to makes sure I play stuff that isn’t obvious, that I didnt play the last time they heard me and that will make people dance. I’m also playing Semtek’s UKG influenced night, Special Request, soon, so I’ve been digging through loads of proto-UKG records – Mentalintrum, Zach Toms, Todd Terry, Marc Kinchen, Booker T, Ricky Morrison and that sort of thing. I know Todd Edwards is missing from the list – but I can’t bear his stuff. Actually, don’t tell Semtek that.

Describe a typical night at Thunder.

A proper party! I know that’s pretty clichéd but that’s what it is. A bunch of mates, many of whom we’ve met since we started, cool Dalston club kids, older heads, and maybe a few random stragglers, like the bloke in the blazer and his girlfriend who came by chance, stayed all night and we ended up leaving on the dancefloor of a Caribbean drinking den at 7am the next morning. We’ll make sure the music is spot on –  we’ve been booking DJs like Sven Weisemann and Patrice Scott, who you simply would not expect to hear play in a venue the size of ours, supported by the three residents, then we stick it all in a East London basement, shake it up and see what happens. It does tend to get a bit messy and guess if you don’t like that, dancing or staying up till the following day, it probably isn’t for you. Luckily lots of people do like it.

Dream guest?

Tony Humphries. But we’d need a time machine because the 2012 Tony Humphries doesn’t float my boat at all. That rawness, that energy, that edge he had is gone. I want the Tony Humphries who was at the epicentre of New York house explosion, the Zanzibar resident, the Mastermix king, the man who broke records for every producer in the Big Apple, the man with the hottest tunes, the sweetest skills – the DJ Tony was 20 years ago.

The time machine is still work in progress though, so until that’s sorted, DJ Nature, which is the recording alias of the now New York based DJ formerly known as Milo from the Wild Bunch. He’s taken that Humphries style and progressed it to where I think it should be right now – German techy house mixed with vocals mixed with stuff like Portable, chopped up disco breaks and World Unknown releases. He’s absolutely brilliant. Actually, I need to talk to Joe and Rick and sort that dream out…

Listen to ROUGH Mix 001:  Miles Simpson-Mixx For Someone A Little Faster below.

Tracklist

Cartlon – Love Time (Prescription mix)

Ron Trent – Pop, Dip, Spin

Ripperton – Leonors Lanugo (Radio Slave Remix)

STL – Silent State 
Dave Angel – Tokyo Stealth Fighter (Carl Craig mix)

Oasis – #17

I:Cube – Acid Tablet

Patrice Scott – Motions

Prommer and Barack – Lovin (Andre Lodemann Remix)

Orpheus – Waiting For Your Call

Cabin Fever – Blow Smoke Up The Ass

Theo Parrish – Synthetic Flemm

Da Sampla – Over

The next Thunder is at The Waiting Room w/ Patric Scott on 18th May.

Read more from Miles at Beyond The Stars

Thunder illustrations by Neil Edward

M.A.C REVIEW – BRIGHT AND BEST SHADES

COMESTICS BY MAC

Photography – ANDREW HILES

 Conceptual Stylist- CUBA CHARLES;

Make Up Artist – NIKKI WOLFF

Models- VIKTORIA & LORENA @ ELITE MODEL MANAGEMENT LONDON

Special Thanks to TESTBED 1 – http://www.testbed1.com

I dont know where you come from but I can tell you for sure one of the hottest cosmetics brands on the markets here in London is MAC. It has certainly become an addiction of citys ladies and continues to excite us with more brilliant products.

Now Id like to suggest you few MAC products that you should definitely have in your make-up stand.

Lets start with MAC Mineralize Foundation. Thats the second foundation I used from this brand, and even though I dont use foundations too often, that one will have its permanent place amongst my cosmetics. First of all, it supplies you skin with moisture which not many foundations do, so you definitely wont have any feeling of dryness after using it, unite the opposite, youll almost feel a touch of cream when applying the foundation. And it has SPF 15, we all know how important that is during any season. But the best thing about this foundation is the look of your skin gets after application. The foundation has a perfect coverage, any imperfections you might have seem blurred, barely noticeable. Skin looks smooth and has a healthy natural glow to it. And if you are like me and have freckles on your pretty face, this miracle foundation will give your skin that smooth even tone and the freckles wont show as much. So far the best foundation I tried for this purpose. Brilliant in making your skin look flawless yet its light and moisturising. Fabulous combination.
Another product for your skin, Id like to mention, is MAC Lustre Drops. I didnt expect to like it as much, but that is something you do want to have in you make-up stand to pump your skin with that golden glow. Essentially the texture reminds of liquid gold packed in 18ml bottle. Just few tiny drops on your cheeks and your face will look more flirty, sun kissed with a tint of golden shine to it. Brilliant for hot summer nights or just hot parties.

Last but not least, MAC matte lipstick, the product that made MAC famous. Ill start with naming the quality that is most required in a lipstick – long lasting. And it really is. Dont be surprised if you fall asleep after a party without removing your make-up and wake a with your lips all dress up for another party. What I personally find extremely important is that there are whole 42 shades of this lipstick. Anything colour your heart desires is there, from soft vintage shades to bright and daring neon colours like Candy Yum-Yum, which is my latest find. Lipstick feela very soft and velvety on your lips, and smells so good you wouldnt believe. So if you want to be confident and gorgeous and not feeling a need to check if your lipstick is still there every 15 minutes, definitely go for this MAC signature product and I promise you wont regret it a minute, even if you get 10 shades at once. http://www.maccosmetics.co.uk

A.P.C. X VANESSA SEWARD COLLABORATION

A.P.C. have collaborated with designer Vanessa Seward on a 19-piece capsule collection for Autumn/Winter 2012.

Meeting through a mutual admiration for each other’s designs, A.P.C. designer Jean Touitou and Vanessa Sewards collaboration seems like a case natural progression.

As  with A.P.C. the fabrics are key to this collection; retaining the spirit of each designer Jean and Vanessa sourced fabric from the archive holders of what used to be Soieries Abraham, the clean lines of A.P.C .mixed with Vanessas love of glamour and dressing. Vanessas style gives the A.P.C. look much more femininity, a sexier edge without the use of tailoring, the waist for example is always belted and higher while the shoulder remains narrower and dainty, “quiet glamour” as A.P.C like to call it.

Fabrics used in the collection are of the highest-quality while remaining true to A.P.C.s philosophy and awareness of the fashion societys economy at this time; finished garments have been produced in artisan units in Italy and France.

 

Items include tops, tunic dresses, blouse dresses and an all in one short playsuit.

BEAUTY: LETS TALK BOBBI BROWN…

 

Comestics by Bobby Brown

PhotographyDIDYER ZARATE

Conceptual Stylist:  CUBA CHARLES

Make up Artist: NORA BELOVAI

Models: VERITY & REBECKA at MODELS1

With thanks to TESTBED 1 http://www.testbed1.com

Lets talk about Bobbi. Bobbi who? Bobbi Brown, of course. Now I am still familiarising myself with that brand. Established by an American business woman, Bobbi Brown, the brand has quickly conquered the cosmetics market and now slowly conquering my make-up stand.

Id like to talk about few products that are certainly worth your attention and your money. To start with Ill tell you about Bobbi Brown Brightening Brick. I have only started using illuminating powers not so long ago, and for those of you who want that glowing complexion it is a perfect tool. Different brands produce their powers using either more or less of bright shimmering details in their texture. Which means that some illuminating powers should be worn during the day time, others are more suitable for evening time. When it comes to Bobbi Browns illuminating power I would definitely put it under evening make-up, it has quite enough of sparking details in its formula. It creates a lit-from-within glow plus a hint of pretty pink. If you do insist to wear it day time, you can wear it as a blush. This will certainly make your face more bright and playful. And for an evening time, cover all your face lightly with the power and it will create an absolutely beautiful glowing effect.

Next is Bobbi Brown eye shadows from their Navy & Nude Eye Collection. For those of you who prefer that natural look and still want to accent their eyes for day or night time this palette is a must have. This latest palette is packed with eight skin tone-inspired shadows, including sparkle, shimmer and metallic shade – plus the perfect hue of inky blue (that doubles as an eyeliner). These combination of colours allows to look sophisticated at work and be a glamorous yet natural beauty at the evening time. If you keep it in your purse youll be able to easily transform you day look into a night one.

As every make-up finishes with putting on a lipstick or lip gloss – here are some options that Bobbi Brown offers to you. First, a brand new Sheer Lip Color lipstick. It has a lightweight formula for lips that delivers an effortless wash of colour plus nourishing shine. It has luxurious butters and oils in its formula that improve the overall condition of lips. Glides on smoothly and evenly, and, believe me, your lips will have that smoothness and softness to them that you (and yours somebody) wont be able to get enough of. It comes in creamy and shimmery shades, so youll have plenty of choices.

And one more treat for your lips is Bobbi Browns Lip Gloss. The product itself is not new, but the new shades are now available and the brand has has sized up all their glosses to give you an extra dose of shine. Great thing about this lip gloss is formulated with soothing botanical extracts – including Avocado, Jojoba and Chamomile Oils, and Aloe Extract – to keep lips soft and supple. This has been my number one lip gloss for a few month now and I highly recommend it. Plus, it has a gorgeous scent with a hint of Vanilla.

So go ahead, pick and grab your “Bobby” and enjoy it as long as it lasts.

CREDITS

Comestics by Bobby Brown

Photography : DIDYER ZARATE; Concept: CUBA CHARLES; Make up: NORA BELOVAI; Models: VERITY & REBECKA at MODELS1

With thanks to TESTBED 1 http://www.testbed1.com

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